CBSE-2016 Syllabus for Fine Arts-Painting Classes XI and XII

Painting

Introduction

The course in Painting at Senior Secondary stage as an elective subject is aimed to develop aesthetic sense of the students through the understanding of various important well known aspects and modes of visual art expression in India's rich cultural heritage from the period Indus valley to the present time. It also encompasses practical exercises in drawing and painting to develop their mental faculties of observation, imagination, creation and physical skills required for its expressions.

Objectives

Theory (History of Indian Art)

The objective of including the history of Indian Art for the students is to familiarise them with the various styles and modes of art expressions from different parts of India. This would enrich their vision and enable them to appreciate and develop an aesthetic sensibility to enjoy the beauty of nature and life. The students will also have an opportunity to observe and study the evolution of its mutations and synthesis with other style and the rise of an altogether new style. The students should be made aware of art as a human experience. The teachers should be able to expose them to the wide range of artistic impressions, the media and the tools used. The history of Indian Art is a long one. Hence the students would be acquainted with brief glimpses of the development of Indian Visual Art as are required for concept formation. Examples included in the course of study are selected because of their aesthetic qualities and are intended purely as guidelines.

Practicals

The purpose of introducing practical exercises: In Painting is to help and enable the students:

  • To develop skill of using drawing and painting material (surface, tools and equipments etc.) effectively.
  • To sharpen their observation skills through study of common objects and various geometrical and non-geometrical forms found in life and nature.
  • To develop their skills to draw and paint these observations:
  • To develop an understanding of Painting-Composition (The use of the elements and the principles of painting-composition)
  • To create the forms and the colour schemes in imagination with an ability to express them effectively in drawing and painting
  • To express the different feelings and moods of life and nature in lines, forms and colours.

Class XI (THEORY) One Theory Paper Time: 2 Hours and 40 Marks

Unitwise Weightage

History of Indian Art

Units-Marks

Pre-Historic Rock Paintings and Art of Indus Valley-10 Marks

Buddhist, Jain & HinduArt-15 Marks

Temple Sculpture. Broznes and Artistic aspects of Indo-Islamic Architecture-15 Marks

Unit 1: Pre-historic Roack Paintings and Art of Indus Valley-12 Pds

(2500 B. C. To 1500 B. C.)

Pre-Historic Rock-Paintings Introduction

  1. Period and Location
  2. Study of following Pre-historic Paintings:
    1. ARoaringAnimal, Bhimbethaka
    2. Wizard's Dance, Bhimbethaka

Introduction

  1. Period and Location.
  2. Extension: In about 1500 miles
    1. Harappa & Mohenjo-daro (Now in Pakistan)
    2. Ropar, Lothal, Rangpur, Alamgirpur, Kali Bangan, Banawali and Dhaula Veera (in India)

Study of following Sculptures and Terracottas:

  1. Dancing girl (Mohenjo-daro) Bronze, 10.5 × 5 × 2.5 cm. Circa 2500 B. C. (Collection: National Museum, New Delhi),
  2. Male Torso (Harappa) Red lime Stone, 9.2 × 5.8 × 3 cms. Circa 2500 B. C (Collection: National Museum, New Delhi).
  3. Mother Goddess (Mohenjo-daro) terracotta, 22 × 8 × 5 cm. Circa 2500 B. C (Collection: National Museum New Delhi).

Study of following Seal:

  1. Bull (Mohenjo-daro) Stone (Steatite), 2.5 × 2.5 × 1.4 cm. Circa 2500 B. C (Collection: National Museum, New Delhi).

Study of following: Decoration on earthen wares:

  • Painted earthen-ware (Jar) Mohenjo-daro (Collection: National Museum, New Delhi).

Unit 2: Buddhist, Jain and Hindu Art-24 Pds

3rd century B. C. To 8th century A. D.

General Introduction to Art during Mauryan, Shunga, Kushana Gandhra and Mathura style & Gupta period:

Study of following Sculptures:

  • Lion Capital from Sarnath (Mauryan period) Polished sand stone, Circa 3rd Century B. C (Collection: Sarnath Musseum, U. P.).
  • Chauri Bearer from Didar Ganj (Yakshi) (Mauryan period) Polished sand stone Circa 3rd Century B. C (Collection: Patna Museum, Bihar).
  • Bodhisattva head from Taxila (Kushan period-Gindhara style) Stone, 27.5 × 20 × 15c. m. Circa 2nd Century A. D (Collection: National Museum, New Delhi).
  • Seated Buddha from Katra Tila Mathura- (Kushan Period) -Mathura Style Red-spotted Sand Stone, Circa 3rd Century AD. Stone (Collection: Govt. Museum, Mathura)
  • Seated Buddha from Sarnath (Gupta period) Stone Circa 5th century AD (Collection: Sarnath Museum U. P.)
  • Jain Tirathankara (Gupta period) Stone Circa 5th Century A. D (Collection: State Museum, Lucknow U. P.).

Introduction to Ajanta

Location, period, No. Of caves, Chaitya and Vihara, Paintings and Sculptures, subject-matter and technique etc.

Study of Following Painting & Sculpture:

  1. Padmapani Bodhisattva (Ajanta Cave No. I, Maharashra) Mural Painting Circa 5th Century A. D.
  2. Mara Vijay (Ajanta Cave No. 26) Sculpture in stone. Circa 5th Century A. D.

Unit 3: Temples Sculpture, Bronzes and Artistic aspects of Indo-Islamic Architecture-36 Pds

Artistic aspects of Indian Temple sculpture (6th Century A. D. To 13th Century A. D.)

  1. Introduction to Temple Sculpture (6th Century A. D. To 13th Century A. D.) Study of following Temple-Sculptures
    1. Descent of Ganga (Pallava period, Mahabalipuram Tamilnadu), Granite rock Circa 7th Century A. D.
    2. Ravana shaking Mount Kailash (Rashtrakuta period, Ellora, Maharashtra) Stone 8th Century A. D.
    3. Trimurti (Elephanta, Maharashtra) Stone Circa 9th Century A. D.
    4. Lakshmi Narayana (Kandariya Mahadev Temple) (Chandela period, Khajuraho, M. P.) Stone Circa 10th Century A. D.
    5. Cymbal Player, Sun Temple (Ganga Dynesty, Konark, Orissa) Stone. Circa 13th Century A. D.
    6. Mother & Child (Vimal-Shah Temple, Solanki Dynesty, Dilwara, Mount Abu, Rajasthan) White marble. Circa 13th Century A. D.

Bronzes: 12 Pds

  1. Introduction to Indian Bronzes
  2. Method of casting (solid and hollow)
  3. Study of following south Indian Bronzes:
  1. Nataraj (Chola period Thanjavur Distt. Tamilnadu) 12th Century A. D (Collection: National Museum, New Delhi.).
  2. Devi (Uma) Chola Period 11th Century A. D (Collection: National Museum, New Delhi.).

Artistic Aspects of the Indo-Islamic Architecture-12 Pds

  1. Introduction
  2. Study of following architectures:
  1. Qutab Minar, Delhi
  2. Taj Mahal, Agra
  3. Gol Gumbaj of Bijapur.

Class XI (Practical) 60 Marks and 6 hours

Unitwise Weightage

Units-Nature and Object Study-Painting Composition-PortfolioAssessment

Unit 1: Nature and Object Study-60 Pds

Study of two or three natural and geometric forms in pencil with light and shade from a fixed point of view. Natural forms life plants, vegetables, fruits and flowers etc. are to be used. Geometrical forms of objects like cubes, cones, prisms, cylinders and sphere should be used (20 Marks).

Unit 2: Painting Composition

  1. Simple exercises of basic design in variation of geometric and Rhythmetic shapes in Geometrical and Decorative designs colours to understand designs as organised visual arrangements (10 Mark). 30 Pds.
  2. Sketches from Life and Nature- (10 Mark) 30Pds.

Unit 3: Portfolio Assessment

  1. Record of the entire years'performance from sketch to finished product (10 Marks).
  2. Five selected Nature and object study exercises drawings in any media done during the session including minimum of two still life exercise (5 Mark). 24 Pds.
  3. Two selected works of paintings done during the year- (5 Mark) 24 Pds.
  4. These selected works prepared during the course by the candidates and certified by the school authorities as the work done in the school will be placed before the examiners for assessment.

Note:

  1. The candidates should be given one hour-break after first three hours.
  2. The time-table to be so framed as to allow the students to work continuously for minimum of two periods at a stretch.

Class XII (Theory) One Theory Paper Time: 2 Hours and 40 Marks

Unitwise Weightage

History of Indian Art

  • The Rajasthani and Pahari Schools of Miniature Painting-10 Marks
  • The Mughal and Deccan Schools of Miniature Painting-10 Marks
  • The Bengal School of Painting-10 Marks
  • The Modern Trends in Indian Art-10 Marks

Unit 1: The Rajasthani and Pahari Schools of Miniature Painting (16th Century A. D. To 19th Century A. D.) -24 Pds. Abrief introduction to Indian Miniature Schools: Western-Indian, Pala, Rajasthani, Mughal, Central India, Deccan and Pahari.

The Rajasthani School:

  1. Origin and Development
  2. Sub-Schools-Mewar, Bundi, Jodhpur, Bikaner, Kishangarh and Jaipur
  3. Main features of the Rajasthani School
  4. Study of the following Rajasthani Paintings:
  • Maru-Ragini-Sahibdin-Mewar
  • RajaAniruddha Singh Hara-Utkal Ram-Bundi
  • Chaugan Players-Dana-Jodhpur
  • Krishna on swing-Nuruddin-Bikaner
  • Radha (Bani-Thani) -Nihal Chand-Kishangarh
  • Bharat Meets Rama at Chitrakut-Guman-Jaipur

The Pahari School:

  1. Origin and development
  2. Sub-Schools-Basohli, Guler, Kangra, Chamba and Garhwal
  3. Main features of the Pahari School
  4. Study of the following Pahari Paintings:
  • Krishna with Gopis-Manaku-Basohli
  • Bharat Worshipping____Charan_Padukas of Rama-Unknown-Guler
  • Cosmic Dance of Shiva-Unknown-Chamba
  • Nand, Yashoda and Krishna with Kinsmen____going to Vrindavana-Nainsukh-Kangra
  • Radha and Krishna Looking into a Mirror-Unknown-Garhwal

Unit 2: The Mughal and Deccan Schools of Miniature Painting (16th CenturyAD to 19th Century A. D.) 24 Pds

The Mughal School

  1. Origin and development
  2. Main features of the Mughal School
  3. Study of the following Mughal Paintings:
  • Title-Painter-Period
  • Ragini Pathamsika-Painter-Ahmadnagar
  • SultanAbdulla Qutb Shah-Unknown-Bijapur
  • Hazrat NizamuddinAaliya and Amrikusro-Unknown-Hyderabad
  • Dancers-Unknown
  • Hyderabad
  • Chand Bibi Playing Polo (Chaugan) -Unknown-Gol Konda

The Bengal School of Painting-24 Pds (Above mid of the 19th Centuary)

  1. New Era in Indian Art-an introduction
  2. Study of the following painting
  3. Rama Vanquishing the pride of the ocean-Raja Ravi Varma
  4. Evolution of the Indian National Flag (First-1906, Middle-1921 and Final 1947 stages): Study of the form and the colour scheme
  1. Introduction to the Bengal School of Painting
    1. Origin and development of the Bengal School of painting
    2. Main features of the Bengal School of painting
  2. Contribution of Indian artists in the struggle for National Freedom Movement
  3. Study of the following paintings of the Bengal school:
  1. Journey's End-Abanindranath Tagore
  2. Tiller of the Soil-Nandlal Bose
  3. Rasa-Lila-Kshitindranath Majumdar
  4. Radhika-M. A. R. Chughtai
  5. Meghdoot-Ram Gopal Vijaivargiya

Unit 4-The Modern Trends in Indian Art

Introduction

Study of the following work of Contemporary (Modern) Indian Art

Paintings

  1. Magician-Gaganendranath Tagore
  2. Mother and child-Jamini Roy
  3. Three Girls-Amrita Sher Gil
  4. Mother Tersa-M. F. Hussain.
  5. Gossip-N. S. Bendre
  6. Untitled-G. R. Santosh

Graphic-prints:

  1. Whirl pool-Krishna Reddy
  2. Children-Somnath Hore
  3. Devi-Jyoti Bhatt
  4. Of Walls-Anupam Sud
  5. Man, Woman and Tree K. Laxma Goud

Sculptures:

  1. Triumph of Labour-D. P. Roychowdhury
  2. Santhal Family-Ramkinker Vaij
  3. Cries Un-heard-Amar Nath Sehgal
  4. Ganesha-P. V. Jankiram
  5. Chatturmukhi-Aekka Yada Giri Rao

The names of artists and litles of their art work as listed above are only suggestive and in no way exhaustive. Teachers and students should expand this according to their own resources. However, the questions will be set from the above mentioned art works only.

Class XII (Practical) Painting

One Practical Paper 6 Hours and 60 Marks

Unitwise Weightage

  • Nature, and Object Study--20 Marks
  • Painting Composition--20 Marks
  • PortfolioAssessment--20 Marks

Unit 1: Nature and Object study-60 Pds

Studies on the basis of exercises done in class XI with two or three objects and drapery for background. Exercises in pencil with light and shade and in full colour from a fixed point of view.

Unit 2: Painting Composition-60 Pds

Imaginative painting based on subjects from Life and or Nature in water and poster colours with colour values.

Unit 3: Portfolio Assessment-48 Pds

  1. Record of the entire years'performance from sketch to finished product (10 Marks).
  2. Five selected Nature and object Study exercises in any media done during the session, including minimum of two still life exercises (5 Marks).
  3. Two selected works of paintings done by the candidate during the year- (5 Marks) These selected works prepared during the course by the candidate and certified by the school authorities as the work done in the school will be placed before the examiners for assessment.

Note: The time-table to be so framed as to allow the students to work continuously for minimum of two periods at a stretch.

Guidelines for Evaluation of Practical

Marking Scheme:

Part I: Nature and Object Study

  1. Treatment Of Media/Colours-05 Marks
  2. Drawing (composition) -10 Marks
  3. Overall impression-05 Marks

Part II: Painting Composition

  1. Compositional arrangement including emphasis on the subject-10 Marks
  2. Treatment of media (colour) -05 Marks
  3. Originality Creativity and overall impression-05 Marks

Part III: Portfolio Assessment

  1. Record of the entire years'performance from sketch to finished product-10 Marks
  2. Five selected Nature and object study exercises in any media including minimum of two still lives-05 Marks
  3. Two selected painting compositions prepared on the basis of life and nature-05 Marks

Format of the Questions:

Part I: Nature and Object Study

Draw and paint the still-life of a group of objects arranged on a drawing board before you, from a fixed point of view (given to you), on a drawing paper of half imperial size in pencil/colours. Your drawing should be proportionate to the size of the paper. The objects should be painted in realistic manner with proper light and shade and perspective etc. In this study the drawing-board is not to be included.

Note: A group of objects to be decided by the external and internal examiners jointly as per instructions. The objects for Nature study and object study are to be arranged before the candidates.

Part II: Painting Composition:

Make a Painting-Composition on anyone of the following five subjects in any medium (Water/Pastel, Tempera, Acrylic) of your choice on a drawing-paper of half imperial size either horizontally or vertically. Your composition should be original and effective. Weightage will be given to a well composed drawing, effective use of media, proper emphasis on the subject matter and utilization of full-space Note: Any five subjects for Painting Composition are to be decided by the external and internal examiners jointly as per instructions and are to mentioned here strictly just before the start of the examination for part II.

Instructions for the selection of the objects for Nature and Object Study:

  1. The examiners, are to select/decide two or three. Suitable objects in such a way so that Natural and Geometrical forms may be covered in the group of objects:
    1. Natural-forms-large size foliage and flowers, fruits, and vegetables etc.
    2. Geometrical forms made of Wood/Plastic/Paper/Metal/Earthen etc. Such as cube, cone, prism, cylinder and sphere.
  2. Objects should be selected generally of large (suitable) size.
  3. An object relating to nature, according to the season and location of the examination centtre, must be included in the group of objects. The natural-objects should be purchased/arranged only on the day of the examination so that its freshness may be maintained.
  4. Two draperies in different colours (one in dark and other in light tone) are also to be included for background and foreground, keeping in view the colours and tones of the objects selected.

Instructions to decide the subjects for Painting-Composition:

  1. The examiners, are to select/decide five subjects suitable for Painting-Composition.
  2. The subjects should be so designed that the candidates may get clear-cut ideas of the subjects and they can exercise their imagination freely, because it is not important what you do, but how you do it.
  3. The examiners are free to select/decide the subjects, but these should be according to the standard of Class XII and environment of the school/candidates.

Some identified areas of the subjects for Painting-Composition are given below, in which some more areas may also be added:

  1. Affairs of family friends and daily life.
  2. Affairs of family Professionals.
  3. Games and sports activities.
  4. Nature
  5. Fantasy
  6. National, religious, cultural, historical and social events and celebrations.

General Instructions to the examiners:

  1. Candidates should be given one hour break after first three hours.
  2. Work of the candidates, for Parts I, II and III, pre to be evaluated on the spot jointly by the external and internal examiners.
  3. Each work of Part I, II and III, after assessment is to be marked as “Examined” and duly signed by the external and internal examiners jointly.

Some Reference Books Suggested for Teachers (For Practical Portion):

  1. “Paint Still life” by Claretta White yet to be revised (Walter T. Foster Publication).
  2. “Art of Drawing” Grumbacher Library Wook (Walter T. Foster Publication).
  3. “On Techniques” By Leon Frank (Walter T. Foster Publication).
  4. “More Trees” by Fredrick Gardner (Walter T. Foster Publication).
  5. “How to Draw and Paint Textures of Animals” By Walter J. Wilweding (WaterT. Foster Publication).
  6. “How to Draw and Paint Animal Expressions” by Walter J. Wilweding (Walter T. Foster Publication).
  7. “Art of the Pencil” by Borough Johnson (Sir ISAAC Pitman & Sons Ltd. New Delhi).
  8. “Design for you” by Ethel Jane Beitler (John Wilary & Sons Ltd. New Delhi).
  9. “Complete Book of Artist's Techniques” by Dr. Kurt Herbers (Thomas and Hudson, London),