Important elements in Sentence Correction for GMAT

Logic and grammar

  • Bottom level is considered the mainstay of sentence correction where logic and grammar should be considered covering proper contrasts and parallelism.
  • This is where the analysis should begin.
  • If the answer has an error in grammar like subject verb agreement or an error in logic, like illogical modifier then the answer should be removed.
  • Such errors are more neutral than biased than something like an indefinite modifier.
  • That is the reason why you should begin with grammar and logic. These errors are not a matter of sentence and are easier to lead.
  • Particularly in few students, who get a terrific return on asset from leading rules of common modifiers, consisting participial phrases, prepositions, appositives and relative clauses.

Clarity and specificity

  • The first level of analysis should remove most answer choices based on the imperfections in grammar and logic but sometimes there are answer choices which have or seem to be correct in grammar and logic wise, at this point you can move to the next analysis that is clarity and specificity.
  • This is when it is suitable to remove answer choices that have pronouns that are not clearly matched to originators.


  • At the top of the Process Pyramid is Briefness.
  • Most sentence correction questions do not need you to climb so high on the pyramid.
  • It is only when two or more answers are logically and grammatically acceptable and are each clear and specific that you need to bring briefness into the equation.
  • However, the Official Guide elaborates many answer choices as “unnecessarily wordy.”
  • So if you do find that you have two or more answer choices that satisfy the first two levels of the process pyramid only then do you remove the one that is “wordy.”
  • Looking for errors such as a confusing pronoun is fine; just make sure that you do wisely and at the proper time. Use the process pyramid to organize errors and address those errors in the proper order: Grammar and logic, clarity and specificity and finally, at the end Briefness.