AILET (All India Law Entrance Test) 2018 MCQs Questions with Solutions and Explanations at Doorsteptutor. Com Part 2

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Question 8

Direction: Name the various Figures of Speech in the following.

Sceptre and crown

Must tumble down,

And In dust be equal made

With the poor crooked scythe and spade.

A. Irony

B. Metonymy

C. Apostrophe

D. Synecdoche

Question 9

Direction: Name the various Figures of Speech in the following.

Brave Macbeth, with his brandished steel, carved out his passage.

A. Metaphor

B. Litotes

C. Climax

D. Synecdoche

Question 10

Direction: Name the various Figures of Speech in the following.

We had nothing to do, and we did it very well.

A. Antithesis

B. Paradox

C. Anti-climax

D. Litotes

Question 11

Direction: Name the various Figures of Speech in the following.

And thou, Dalhousie, the great god of war Lieutenant-Colonel to the Earl of Mari

A. Apostrophe

B. Epigram

C. Anti-climax

D. Paradox

Question 12

Direction: Name the various Figures of Speech in the following.

The Puritan had been rescued by no common deliverer from the gasp of no common foe.

A. Hyperbole

B. Epigram

C. Metaphor

D. Litotes

Question 13

Direction: Choose the sentence (s) which is/are punctuated correctly.

I. Our daughter will be three years old next week.

II. Our son will be two-years-old next week.

III. Our two-year-old is starting to talk.

IV. Our two-year-old is starting to talk.

A. I, III

B. I & IV

C. II, III

D. III

Question 14

Direction: Choose the sentence (s) which is/are punctuated correctly.

I. Jan asked; “What did Joe mean when he said, ′I will see you later.”

II. Jan asked, What did Joe mean when he said, ‘I will see you later?’ ″

III. Jan asked, ′What did Joe mean when he said, ‘I will see you later’ ? ″

IV. Jan asked, ″What did Joe mean when he said, ï will see you later ″?

A. II

B. I

C. IV

D. III

Question 15

Direction: Choose the sentence (s) which is/are punctuated correctly.

I. You are my friend; however, I cannot afford to lend you any more money.

II. Truly, a popular error has as many lives as a cat: it comes walking in, long after you have imagined it effectually strangled.

III. There is only one cure for the evils which newly acquired freedom produces, and that cure is freedom.

IV. There is a slavery that no legislation can abolish; the slavery of caste.

A. I, II, III

B. II, IV

C. I, II, III, IV

D. II, III

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