CAT Model Paper 2 Questions and Answers with Explanation Part 8

Glide to success with Doorsteptutor material for CTET/Paper-2 : get questions, notes, tests, video lectures and more- for all subjects of CTET/Paper-2.

Download PDF of This Page (Size: 105K)

Start Passage

Directions for questions 43 to 45:- Answer the questions based on the passage given below.

Stephen King has been quoted as saying that although Kubrick made “The Shining” with memorable imagery, it was not a good adaptation of his novel and is the only adaptation of his novels that he could “remember hating”. Notably, before this King often said he did not care about the film adaptations of his novels.

King thought that his novel’s important themes, such as the disintegration of the family and the dangers of alcoholism, were ignored. King has admitted he was suffering from alcoholism at the time he wrote the novel, and as such there was an element of autobiography in the story. King especially viewed the casting of Nicholson as a mistake and as being too early a tip-off to the audience that the character Jack would eventually go mad (due to Nicholson’s identification with the character of McMurphy in One Flew Over the Cuckoo`s Nest). King had suggested that a more “everyman”-like actor such as Jon Voight or Michael Moriarty play the role, so that Jack’s subsequent descent into madness would be more unnerving.

At other times, King suggested that he disliked the downplaying of the supernatural element of the film, which he felt took the “bite” out of the story and made Jack a less sympathetic character. According to King, he viewed Jack as being victimized by the genuinely external supernatural forces haunting the hotel, whereas Kubrick’s take viewed the haunting and its resulting malignancy as coming from within Jack himself.

King’s oft-cited remark about Kubrick being a man who “thinks too much and feels too little” has frequently been quoted as disparaging Kubrick’s overly clinical and detached approach to directing actors, but in context it is really a reference to Kubrick’s ambivalent skepticism about the reality of the supernatural which emerged in pre-production conversations between King and Kubrick.

Parts of the film are chilling, charged with a relentlessly claustrophobic terror, but others fall flat. Not that religion has to be involved in horror, but a visceral skeptic such as Kubrick just couldn’t grasp the sheer inhuman evil of The Overlook Hotel. So he looked, instead, for evil in the characters and made the film into a domestic tragedy with only vaguely supernatural overtones. That was the basic flaw: because he couldn’t believe, he couldn’t make the film believable to others. What’s basically wrong with Kubrick’s version of The Shining is that it’s a film by a man who thinks too much and feels too little; and that’s why, for all its virtuoso effects, it never gets you by the throat and hangs on the way real horror should.

Mark Browning, a critic of King’s work, observed that King’s novels frequently contain a narrative closure that completes the story, which Kubrick’s film lacks. Browning has in fact argued that King has exactly the opposite problem of which he accused Kubrick. King, he believes, “feels too much and thinks too little.”

King was disappointed by Kubrick’s decision not to film at The Stanley Hotel in Estes Park, Colorado, which inspired the story (a decision Kubrick made because the hotel did not have sufficient snow or electric power). However, King’s animosity toward Kubrick’s adaptation has dulled over time. During an interview segment on the Bravo channel, King stated that the first time he watched Kubrick’s adaptation; he found it to be “dreadfully unsettling”. However, in King’s 1981 nonfiction book Danse Macabre, he listed Kubrick’s film among those he considered to have “contributed something of value to the [horror] genre” and mentioned it as one of his “personal Favourites.”

Q: 43. What could be the possible reason for King not liking Jack`s character in the movie?

(A) As he saw a bit of him in Jack, he would have liked the audience to sympathize with him which was not what Kubrick had done

(B) He wanted Jack to be an alcoholic which Kubrick ignored

(C) He did not like it as it was played by Jack Nicholson

(D) None of these

Ans: A

Sol:

King was battling alcoholism at the time he wrote the book. He wanted Kubrick’s film to explore this. King considered the novel to be a sort of autobiography. So he would have wanted the audience to feel sympathy for Jack. Hence, option A.

The correct choice is (A)

Q: 44. Why did King want Voight or Moriarty to play Jack`s role instead of Nicholson?

(A) It would be revealing to the audience if someone other than Nicholson played the role as he had become famous for playing a mad man`s role in One Flew over Cuckoo`s Nest

(B) King would have liked the acting abilities of Voight and Moriarty

(C) He wanted to criticize the movie in as many ways as he could

(D) He thought Moriarty or Voight was a better fit for the role of an alcoholic rather than Nicholson

Ans: A

Sol:

Refer to the lines: “King had suggested that a more “everyman” -like actor such as Jon Voight or Michael Moriarty play the role, so that Jack’s subsequent descent into madness would be more unnerving.” Nicholson has already played a madman’s role in his previous movie. So the audience would not be in much of a suspense if he played Jack`s role. Hence, option A.

The correct choice is (A)

Q: 45. Which of the following are the differences between Kubrick and as per the passage?

I. The former feels less and thinks more. The latter feels more and thinks less.

II. The films of the former end abruptly. The stories of the latter have a proper climax.

III. The former is unattached to any of his movies. The latter is emotionally attached to all of his books.

(A)

(B)

(C)

(D)

Ans: A

Sol:

The first two differences are clearly mentioned. Refer to the paragraph “Mark Browning, a critic of King’s work, observed that King’s novels frequently contain a narrative closure that completes the story, which Kubrick’s film lacks. Browning has in fact argued that King has exactly the opposite problem of which he accused Kubrick. King, he believes, “feels too much and thinks too little.” The third cannot be concluded as King often said he did not care about the film adaptations of his novels. Hence, option A.

The correct choice is (A)

End Passage

Developed by: