CAT Model Paper 4 Questions and Answers with Explanation Part 9

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Direction for the Questions 46 to 48: Questions are based on the passage below:

She too was restless at home, a big Victorian villa in the Gothic style just off the Banbury Road, fifteen minutes‟ walk away. Violet, her mother, marking finals all day in the heat, was intolerant of Florence’s regular practice routines–repeated scales and arpeggios, double-stopping exercises, memory tests. ‘Screeching’ was the word Violet used, as in, ‘Darling, I’m still not finished for today. Could you bear to delay your screeching until after tea?’

It was supposed to be an affectionate joke, but Florence, who was unusually irritable that week, took it as further evidence of her mother’s disapproval of her career and hostility to music in general and therefore to Florence herself. She knew she ought to feel sorry for her mother. She was so tone-deaf she was unable to recognise a single tune, even the National Anthem, which she could distinguish only by context from Happy Birthday. She was one of those people who could not say if one note was lower or higher than another. This was no less a disability and misfortune than a club foot, or a harelip, but after the relative freedoms of Kensington, Florence was finding home life minutely oppressive and could not muster her sympathies. For example, she did not mind making her bed every morning–she had always done so–but she resented being asked at each breakfast whether she had.

As often happened when she had been away, her father aroused in her conflicting emotions.

There were times when she found him physically repellent and she could hardly bear the sight of him–his gleaming baldness, his tiny white hands, his restless schemes for improving his business and making even more money. And the high tenor voice, both wheedling and commanding, with its eccentrically distributed stresses. She hated hearing his enthusiastic reports about the boat, the ridiculously named Sugar Plum, which he kept down in Poole harbour. It grated on her, his accounts of a new kind of sail, a ship-to-shore radio, a special yacht varnish. He used to take her out with him, and several times, when she was twelve and thirteen, they crossed all the way to Carteret, near Cherbourg. They never talked about those trips. He had never asked her again, and she was glad. But sometimes, in a surge of protective feeling and guilty love, she would come up behind him where he sat and entwine her arms around his neck and kiss the top of his head and nuzzle him, liking his clean scent. She would do all this, then loathe herself for it later.

And her younger sister got on her nerves, with her new cockney accent and cultivated stupidity at the piano. How were they supposed to do as their father demanded and play a Sousa march for him when Ruth pretended that she could not count four beats in a bar?

As always, Florence was adept at concealing her feelings from her family. It required no effort– she simply left the room, whenever it was possible to do so undemonstratively, and later was glad she had said nothing bitter or wounding to her parents or sister; otherwise she would be awake all night with her guilt. She constantly reminded herself how much she loved her family, trapping herself more effectively into silence. She knew very well that people fell out, even stormily, and then made up. But she did not know how to start–she simply did not have the trick of it, the row that cleared the air, and could never quite believe that hard words could be unsaid or forgotten. Best to keep things simple. She could only blame herself then, when she felt like a character in a newspaper cartoon, with steam hissing from her ears.

Q: 46. Which of the following best captures Florence s personality?

(A) Repressed

(B) Happy

(C) Morose

(D) Guilt-ridden

Ans: A

Solution:

The passage makes clear that Florence never had a showdown with her family even when she felt like it because of the fear of the guilt she would experience later. This indicates repression, a smothering of one’s desires. Morose is gloomy, and the passage does not suggest that. She was also not guilt-ridden because she avoided anything that would cause guilt. Answer Repressed.

Hence option A

Q: 47. Who among the following does the tone of the passage indicate Florence was closest to?

(A) Her mother

(B) Her father

(C) Her sister

(D) She felt similarly about all of them

Ans: B

Solution:

While Florence shared a fraught relationship with each of her family members, she showed her father special love when, as the passage states, “sometimes, in a surge of protective feeling and guilty love, she would come up behind him where he sat and entwine her arms around his neck and kiss the top of his head and nuzzle him, liking his clean scent.” Never are her sister and mother treated to such affection. (The fact that she loathed herself later for showing her father affection is immaterial – she still did it.) Answer - Her father

Hence option B

Q: 48. Which of the following cannot be inferred from the passage?

(A) Violet was an instructor of some sort

(B) Florence lived in Kensington when she was not home

(C) Florence s father was in the business of boat material

(D) Florence sympathised with her mother s tone-deafness

Ans: D

Solution:

‘Violet was an instructor’ can be inferred from “Violet, her mother, marking finals all day in the heat,...”

‘Florence lived in Kensington’ can be inferred from ‘but after the relative freedoms of

Kensington, Florence was finding home life minutely oppressive...”

That Florence’s father was in the business of boat material can be inferred from “It grated on her, his accounts of a new kind of sail, a ship-to-shore radio, a special yacht varnish...”

‘Florence sympathized with her mother’s tone-deafness’ is wrong. The passage states the

Opposite: “This was no less a disability and misfortune than a club foot, or a harelip, but ...

Florence ... could not muster her sympathies.’ Answer – ‘Florence sympathized with her

Mother’s tone-deafness.’

End Passage

Q: 49. The sentences and 5 when properly sequenced, form a coherent paragraph. From among the four choices given below the question, choose the MOST LOGICAL ORDER of sentences that constructs a coherent paragraph.

1. Are they providing a service or are they making money out of a scare commodity called Water?

2. At the heart of their existence is a state failure to deliver piped water to all, all the time.

3. To address the shortage and to meet the demand entrepreneurs rig vehicles, buying a chassis and welding a tank to store water.

4. You see them everywhere, some painted yellow, some rigged to tractors as they rush delivering water to a thirsty city.

5. Then a bore well is leased, water pumped into a small overhead reservoir and shipped to where the demand is.

(A)

(B)

(C)

(D)

Ans: A

Solution:

Sentence 1 begins with a rhetorical question referring to ‘they’, without defining or introducing who this ‘they’ is so options are ruled out. In the remaining options , sentences and 5 are arranged in the same order and all that remains is to fix the position of sentence 1 which makes sense only after sentence 4 as it gives a clear indication to the usage of the word ‘they’. Answer

Hence option A

Q: 50. In each of the questions given below, four sentences are given labelled and 4. Of these, three statements need to be arranged in a logical order to form a coherent paragraph/passage. From the given options, choose the option that does not fit the sequence.

1. After BC the Chalk land people started building great circles of earth banks and ditches.

2. Inside, they built wooden buildings and stone circles.

3. Stonehenge was almost certainly a sort of capital, to which the chiefs of other groups came from all over Britain.

4. By far the most spectacular, both then and now, was Stonehenge, which was built in separate stages over a period of more than a thousand years.

(A)

(B)

(C)

(D)

Ans: C

Solution

Look at sentences 1, 2 and 4 and you will notice that all the three sentences talk about building the Stonehenge and sentence 3 oddly refers to how it became a capital. Answer - sentence 3.

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