CAT Model Paper 5 Questions and Answers with Explanation Part 9

Get unlimited access to the best preparation resource for CTET/Paper-1 : get questions, notes, tests, video lectures and more- for all subjects of CTET/Paper-1.

Download PDF of This Page (Size: 147K)

Start Passage

Answer the questions based on the passage given below.

Not long ago, and the beginnings of modern science. I explained, or tried to, that what made Galileo’s work science, properly so-called, wasn’t that he was always right about the universe (he was very often wrong) but that he believed in searching for ways of finding out what was right by figuring out what would happen if he wasn’t.

One story of that search is famous. When he wanted to find out if Aristotle was wrong to say that a small body would fall at a different speed from a large body, he didn’t look the answer up in an old book about falling objects. Instead, he threw cannonballs of two different sizes off the Tower of Pisa, and, checking to make sure that no-one was down there, watched what happened. They hit the ground at the same time.

We know for certain that he attempted lots of adventures in looking that were just as decisive. He looked at stars and planets and the way cannonballs fell on moving ships - and changed the mind of man as he did. We call it the experimental method, and if science had an essence, that would be it.

In Galileo wrote a great book, Dialogue on Two World Systems. It’s one of the best books ever written because it’s essentially a record of a temperament, of a kind of impatience and irritability that leads men to drop things from towers and see what happens when they fall.

He invented a dumb character for the book named Simplicio and two smart ones to argue with him. The joke is that Simplicio is the most erudite of the three - the dumb guy who thinks he’s the smart guy (the original half-bright guy), who’s read a lot but just repeats whatever Aristotle says. He is erudite and ignorant.

Galileo wasn’t naive about experiments. He always emphasizes the importance of looking for yourself. But he also wants to convince you that sometimes it’s important not to look for yourself, not just to trust your own eyes, and that you have to work to understand the real meaning of what you’re seeing.

But on every page of that wonderful book, he’s trying to imagine a decisive test - dropping a cannonball from a ship’s mast, or digging a hole in the ground and watching the Moon - to help you argue your way around the universe.

There’s a lovely moment, it could be the motto of the scientific revolution, when Salviati, one of his alter egos, says, “Therefore Simplicio, come either with arguments and demonstrations and bring us no more Texts and authorities, for our disputes are about the Sensible World, and not one of Paper.”

In that essay I wrote about Galileo I compared him to John Dee, the famous English magician, alchemist and astrologer, who was one of his contemporaries who was also a consultant to Queen Elizabeth I, and who read everything there was to read in his time and knew everything there was to know in the esoterica of his time - but didn’t know what was worth knowing.

He knew a lot about Copernicus, for instance, but he also spent half his life trying to talk to angels and have demons intervene to help him turn lead into gold.

Dee was a learned man - too learned a man, in fact, in whose head all kinds of stuff lodged, some obviously silly and some in retrospect sane, but impacted together like trash in a dump heap. Above all, his work is filled with supernatural explanations - with angels and demons and astrological spells.

Galileo emphatically did not believe in magic. Galileo has no time for supernatural explanations of any kind - indeed, when he goes wrong, as he did when he rejected the idea that the Moon causes the tides, it’s because he resists the right explanation because it just sounds too strange or magical.

Q: 39. Which of the following captures Galileo approach to science?

(A) Deterministic

(B) Factual

(C) Empirical

(D) Theoretical

Ans: (B)

Solution

Determinism is the philosophy that things only happen in a certain way in a certain set of conditions and is irrelevant to the passage.

Factual is not an approach, so wrong

Empirical is correct since Galileo believed in testing everything

Theoretical is wrong since his approach is not based on theory but practice.

Q: 40. What was an outcome of Galileo disbelief in magic?

(A) He was not accorded the respect that scientists like John Dee enjoyed

(B) He was unwilling to accept scientific explanations that sounded magical

(C) In an age when people believed more in enigma than in science, Galileo had to pay with his reputation since he could never become a mainstream scientist

(D) He believed that what people consider magic is actually the precursor to science

Ans: (B)

Solution:

As the last paragraph mentions, Galileo was unwilling to believe the truth about the Moon causing tides because it sounded unreal. The others are neither mentioned nor implied.

Q: 41. How does the author place John Dee in respect to Galileo?

(A) Someone whose work is a mixed bag because it does not follow a scientific temper

(B) Someone whose word is measurably superior because of his erudition

(C) Someone whose interest in the occult made his science richer

(D) Someone who was a contemporary of Galileo and also held other eminent posts

Ans: (A)

Solution

As the passage explains Dee was a learned man who also practised occult which is why some of his discoveries and explanations are incorrect. On the contrary Galileo only believed something that could be proved by experiment. Hence, ‘Someone whose work is a mixed bag because it does not follow a scientific temper’ is the answer.

‘Someone whose word is measurably superior because of his erudition’ and ‘Someone whose interest in the occult made his science richer’ are wrong as per the passage.

‘Someone who was a contemporary of Galileo but also held other eminent posts’ is correct but not the main point of difference between Dee and Galileo.

Q: 42. What is the tone of the author in Dee was a learned man...?

(A) Appreciative

(B) Critical

(C) Sarcastic

(D) Reproachful

Ans: (C)

Solution

The author is sarcastic since he says there was little point in John Dee being learned since he believed in a lot of silly stuff.

Appreciative is wrong outright.

Critical is incorrect. The author, by calling him learned, and then poking fun at him uses sarcasm.

Reproachful too is wrong. It is extreme in this case. It means angry and upset

End Passage

Q: 43. Each sentence has a pair of words that are highlighted. From the highlighted words, select the MOST APPROPRIATE word to form the correct sentence. Then, from the options given, choose the best one.

(1) The sun burned down till the vanish (A)/varnish (B) on the rails cracked and blistered.

(2) I have been asked to glean (A)/gleam (B) data from the records.

(3) This is a historic (A)/historical (B) occasion calling for a celebration.

(4) It was a beautiful dress made of fine crepe (A)/creep (B).

(5) I am delayed in filling (A)/filing (B) my tax returns.

(A) BAAAB

(B) AAAAB

(C) ABABA

(D) BABAA

Ans: (A)

Solution

Varnish is paint; vanish is to disappear

Glean is to collect; gleam is to shine

Historic is important; historical is anything from history

Crepe is a dress material; creep is to disgust

To file one’s tax returns is to submit claims

Start Passage

Directions for Questions 44 to 46: Solve the questions given below on the basis on the following information:

There are five persons and T of different heights, different ages, and different incomes. The following information is also known:

Q earns the least but is not the oldest. T is the youngest but does not earn the highest.

Q is older than S who earns more than P who is taller than R and S and earns less than T.

No person got the same rank on any two parameters.

R does not get 1st rank in any parameter. Q got 3rd rank in height and T’s income is not the 2nd highest.

They are arranged in decreasing order of age, height and income.

Q: 44. If S is older than R, then R is shorter than how many persons?

(A)

(B)

(C)

(D)

Ans: (A)

Solution

There are two arrangements possible:

Q_44_Table of Two Arrangements Possible
Q_44_Table of Two Arrangements Possible

Arrangement-1

Rank

Age

Height

Income

1

P

T

S

2

Q

P

R

3

R

Q

T

4

S

R

P

5

T

S

Q

Arrangement-2

Rank

Age

Height

Income

1

P

T

S

2

Q

P

R

3

S

Q

T

4

R

S

P

5

T

R

Q

If S is older than R, then arrangement 2 follows. Here R is the shortest.

Q: 45. What is the rank of P in age, height and income respectively?

(A)

(B)

(C) 1st, 2nd and 3rd

(D) None of these

Ans: (B)

Solution:

There are two arrangements possible:

Q_45_Table of Two Arrangements Possible
Q_45_Table of Two Arrangements Possible

Arrangement-1

Rank

Age

Height

Income

1

P

T

S

2

Q

P

R

3

R

Q

T

4

S

R

P

5

T

S

Q

Q_45_1_Table of Two Arrangements Possible
Q_45_1_Table of Two Arrangements Possible

Arrangement-2

Rank

Age

Height

Income

1

P

T

S

2

Q

P

R

3

S

Q

T

4

R

S

P

5

T

R

Q

In both the arrangements, P’s rank does not change. It is in age, height and income respectively.

Q: 46. In how many ways can they be arranged?

(A)

(B)

(C)

(D)

Ans: (C)

Solution

There are two arrangements possible:

There are two arrangements possible:

Q_46_Table of Two Arrangements Possible
Q_46_Table of Two Arrangements Possible

Arrangement-1

Rank

Age

Height

Income

1

P

T

S

2

Q

P

R

3

R

Q

T

4

S

R

P

5

T

S

Q

Arrangement-2

Rank

Age

Height

Income

1

P

T

S

2

Q

P

R

3

S

Q

T

4

R

S

P

5

T

R

Q

As we can see, there are 2 arrangements possible.

End Passage

Developed by: