CAT Model Paper 6 Questions and Answers with Explanation Part 11

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Questions 52 to 54: Answer the questions based on the passage given below.

What we are witnessing in Italy is remarkable, and at times scarcely believable. After five failed attempts to elect a new president, an electoral college that includes the members of both chambers of parliament, has plumped for the incumbent, Giorgio Napolitano, who is 87 years old.

Desperate to retire, Mr.. Napolitano had ruled himself out as a candidate. But the leaders of the two biggest mainstream parties, Pier Luigi Bersani, the secretary general of the centre-left Democratic Party (PD), and Silvio Berlusconi, the de facto leader of the conservative People of Freedom (), had earlier gone to the Quirinal palace to beg him to stay on. Poor Mr.. Napolitano wearily agreed.

In the ballot that followed he received 738 votes out of a possible 1,007. It is the first time in the 65-year history of the Italian republic that a president has been voted in for a second term. The insistence on Mr. Napolitano’s return came against a background of almost deafening calls from the younger generation of Italians for new faces, new policies and a form of politics less oppressively dominated by the country’s almighty parties.

The most obvious and radical expression of their demands is in the Five Star Movement (M5S), co-founded by a former comedian, Beppe Grillo. But it is also clearly discernible in the radical Left, Ecology and Freedom (SEL) party and in parts of the traditional parties, notably the moderate faction within the PD that looks to Matteo Renzi, the young mayor of Florence. The mainstream party leaderships ignored them all.

Mr.. Bersani and Mr.. Berlusconi had originally tried to stitch-up the presidency by agreeing on Franco Marini, a former Christian Democrat trade unionist. When that failed, Mr. Bersani opted instead for a clearly partisan choice, the former centre-left prime minister and European Commission president, Romano Prodi. But the luckless Mr.. Prodi’s candidacy was torpedoed by rebels from within the PD.

At all events, factional interests took precedence over those of the party in a way that its members, and the voters, will not easily forget. Mr.. Bersani, doubly humiliated, announced that he would resign as soon as the presidential contest was settled.

When the deciding vote was cast in favour of Mr. Napolitano, Mr. Bersani wept. Mr. Berlusconi smiled broadly. And with good reason. The re-election of Mr. Napolitano leaves the PD (never a very convincing fusion of ex-communists and former Christian Democrats) in outright disarray. It also revives the prospects of a left-right coalition of the sort that Mr. Berlusconi has been calling for ever since the general election two months ago gave Italy a hung parliament. That would not perhaps hand the widely discredited former prime minister a seat in cabinet, but it would most certainly hand him renewed influence over the affairs of the nation at a time when he is a defendant in four trials.

That is one possible outcome. The name most widely touted as the next head of government was that of the year-old Giuliana Amato who first held the job more than 20 years ago. The other possibility is that Mr. Napolitano could form another non-party; technocratic government like the one headed by Mario Monti, the outgoing prime minister.

Mr. Grillo has called for a demonstration in Rome, describing the re-election of the president a “coup d’etat” by the old guard. It was not that. The parties who elected Mr. Napolitano took roughly two-thirds of the votes in the general election. And, in any case, Mr. Grillo, who has never been elected by anyone, is not in a position to give lessons on democracy.

There is a strong case for arguing that this lacerating presidential ballot has re-drawn more starkly than ever before the battle lines in Italian politics. Once they ran between right and left. Now they separate the old and tired from the new and young. For the foreseeable future, the old and tired are firmly back in control.

Q: 52. Which of the following is NOT a reason for the author’s disagreement with Mr. Grillo?

(A) He has never won an election

(B) The man chosen as President was selected by majority-voted parties

(C) It was a coup d’état by the old guard

(D) Each of the above is a reason

Ans: C

Solution:

It was a coup d’état by the old guard.

Refer to the second last paragraph. Both, ‘He has never won an election’ and ‘The man chosen as President was elected by majority-voted parties’ are mentioned as reasons. ‘It was a coup d’état by the old guard’ is not.

Q: 53. Which of the following captures Mr. Bersanis role in the episode?

(A) He tried to stitch up numbers for his choice, unsuccessfully

(B) He wanted to be President himself

(C) He wanted to do everything possible to not let Berlusconi become President

(D) He was sentimental and theatrical

Ans: a

Solution:

He tried to stitch up numbers for his choice, unsuccessfully.

Refer to the fifth paragraph. It clearly explains that Bersani had another choice, Romano Prodi, but failed to muster numbers in his support. ‗He wanted to be President himself’ and ‘He wanted to do everything….’ are not implied anywhere. ‘He was sentimental and theatrical’ is meaningless.

Q: 54. Which of the following is the best replacement for the word ‘lacerating’ in the line: There is a strong case for arguing that this lacerating presidential ballot has re-drawn more starkly than ever before the battle lines in Italian politics?

(A) Bloody

(B) Torturous

(C) Deeply painful

(D) Having sharp edges

Ans: C

Solution:

The lacerating presidential ballot means an election that is not acceptable to most Italians, and is therefore painful. ‗Bloody’ is wrong, there was no blood. Torturous is wrong too, torture is too strong a word. ‗Having sharp edges’ is meaningless. It was lacerating because it was long drawn and divisive and thus painful.

Q: 55. Identify the INCORRECT sentence(s) in terms of grammar, spelling and punctuation.

(A) There are moments during first encountering a writer’s work that set the tone for the relationship a reader will have.

(B) Very early in Garb dale, Fielding visits a Scottish housing estate in search of his cousin Alban.

(C) Banks locates him quickly, with a mix of acid wit and highly particular detail.

(D) On Fielding’s initial approach, he notes long blocks of three- and four-storey flats covered in patchy pebble-dash spotted with poor graffiti.

(A) Only A

(B) Only B

(C) Only C

(D) Only D

Ans: A

Solution:

There are moments during first encountering a writer’s work that set the tone for the relationship a reader will have.

There are moments when first encountering...

Q: 56. The question below has a set of four statements. Each statement can be classified as one of the following. Choose the answer option that reflects the classification of the four statements.

- Facts deal with pieces of information that one has heard, seen or read, and which are open to discovery or verification. The answer option indicates such a statement with an F.

- Inferences, which are conclusions drawn about the unknown, on the basis of the known. The answer option indicates such a statement with an I.

- Judgments, which are opinions that imply approval or disapproval of persons, objects, situations and occurrences in the past, present or future. The answer option indicates such a statement with a J.

(A) With fewer regional players, average fares have risen by 24% in two years.

(B) Most of the steep fall in revenue is attributed to rising fuel costs and hefty take-off taxes.

(C) Tour operators are dismayed, fearing that hitherto small declines in tourist numbers will accelerate into total collapse.

(D) In the space of five days, Air Botswana axed and then reinstated two popular tourist routes.

(A) FIII

(B) FFJF

(C) FIJI

(D) FIJF

Ans: D

Solution:

‘With fewer regional players, average….’ is clearly a fact.

‘Most of the steep fall in revenue…’ is an inference because it is speaking of what the steel fall in revenue has been attributed to. Each of the reasons can be factually verified.

‘Tour operators are dismayed…’ is a judgement. There is no way to measure dismay.

‘In the space of five days….’ is a fact.

Q: 57. The sentences 1, 2, 3, and 4 when properly sequenced, form a coherent paragraph. From among the four choices given below the question, choose the MOST LOGICAL ORDER of sentences that constructs a coherent paragraph.

(1) Loss making South African Airways axed one of its two routes to London last summer.

(2) Zambia and Zimbabwe have no airlines of their own, leaving incoming traffic at the mercy of foreign airlines fickle business plans.

(3) Bizarrely, Zambia’s politicians boast that they have pre-emptively protected a new national carrier that does not actually exist yet, and in which they do not want to invest.

(4) Worse, the regions protectionist governments have thrown up barriers against each other’s airlines.

(A)

(B)

(C)

(D)

Ans: B

Solution:

1 and 2 give two instances of problems with airlines in Africa. There is no way to say which will come first, so both 12 and 21 are correct. But 43 is a pair. In 4, the author is talking of protectionism and in 3 gives an example. Therefore, the only option is .

Start Passage

Questions 58 to 59: Answer these questions after going through the information given below:

Ram is confused about what toppings he should add on his pizza. If he adds chicken, then he would not like to add mutton or pepperoni. If he adds mushrooms then he would add either tomato or olives, but not both. If he adds onions, then he would not like to add tomato. If he adds olives, then he would add baby corn also. He will definitely add extra cheese and mushroom on his pizza.

Q: 58. If he wants to add only four topping on this pizza, then which of the following can he add

(A) Extra cheese, mushroom, tomato, chicken

(B) Extra cheese, mushroom, tomato, pepperoni

(C) Extra cheese, mushroom, olives, baby corn

(D) All of the above

Ans: D

Solution:

The correct choice is (D). As Ram must choose Extra Cheese and Mushroom, he will choose either of tomato or olives with it. If he chooses, olives, he will have to take baby corn also. If he takes tomato, then he cannot take onion.

Hence the possible combinations for 4 items are;

Extra cheese, mushroom, tomato, chicken

Extra cheese, mushroom, tomato, pepperoni

Extra cheese, mushroom, tomato, mutton

Extra cheese, mushroom, olives, baby corn

Q: 59. Which of the following item will he never be able to add on his pizza?

(A) Tomato

(B) Onions

(C) Baby corn

(D) None of these

Ans: D

Solution:

As Ram must choose Extra Cheese and Mushroom, he will choose either of tomato or olives with it. If he chooses, olives, he will have to take baby corn also. If he takes tomato, then he cannot take onion.

Hence the possible combinations for 4 items are;

Extra cheese, mushroom, tomato, chicken

Extra cheese, mushroom, tomato, pepperoni

Extra cheese, mushroom, tomato, mutton

Extra cheese, mushroom, olives, baby corn

If we select four items only then onion cannot be selected. As tomato is there, onion cannot be selected. If we take olives, then baby corn has to be taken and hence no other item can be taken. However, it we take 5 items, then extra cheese, mushroom, olives, baby corn and onion is possible. Hence all the items can be taken in different combinations.

End Passage

Q: 60. If CABLE is coded ZCDAY, then STABLE will be coded as

(A) TPADAY

(B) TPCDCY

(C) TPCDAY

(D) TPCYAY

Ans: C

Solution:

This question can easily be solved from the answer choices. As the last four letters of CABLE and STABLE are same, the last 4 letters of the answer should be same as the code for CABLE, i.e. CDAY. This is correct only in option (C), hence that is the answer.

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