CAT Morning Shift Question and Answer Paper Analysis 2019 Part 13

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Q.25 The four sentences (labelled 1, 2, 3, 4) given below, when properly sequenced would yield a coherent paragraph. Decide on the proper sequence of the order of the sentences and key in the sequence of the four numbers as your answer.

1. If you’ve seen a little line of text on websites that says something like “customers who bought this also enjoyed that” you have experienced this collaborative filtering firsthand.

2. The problem with these algorithms is that they don’t take into account a host of nuances and circumstances that might interfere with their accuracy.

3. If you just bought a gardening book for your cousin, you might get a flurry of links to books about gardening, recommended just for you! – the algorithm has no way of knowing you hate gardening and only bought the book as a gift.

4. Collaborative filtering is a mathematical algorithm by which correlations and co- occurrences of behaviors are tracked and then used to make recommendations.

A. 4123

B. 1432

C. 3214

D. 2341

Ans: B. 1432

Q.26 Five sentences related to a topic are given below. Four of them can be put together to form a meaningful and coherent short paragraph. Identify the odd one out.

Choose its number as your answer and key it in.

1. His idea to use sign language was not a completely new idea as Native

Americans used hand gestures to communicate with other tribes.

2. Ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle, for example, observed that men who are deaf are incapable of speech.

3. People who were born deaf were denied the right to sign a will as they were “presumed to understand nothing; because it is not possible that they have been able to learn to read or write.”

4. Pushback against this prejudice began in the 16th century when Pedro Ponce de León created a formal sign language for the hearing impaired.

5. For millennia, people with hearing impairments encountered marginalization because it was believed that language could only be learned by hearing the spoken word.

Choices:

A. 54132

B. 32154

C. 15423

D. 23541

Ans: A. 54132

Q.27 Five sentences related to a topic are given below in a jumbled order. Four of them form a coherent and unified paragraph. Identify the odd sentence that does not go with the four. Key in the number of the option that you choose.

1. ‘Stat’ signaled something measurable, while ‘matic’ advertised free labour; but ‘tron’, above all, indicated control.

2. It was a totem of high modernism, the intellectual and cultural mode that decreed no process or phenomenon was too complex to be grasped, managed and optimized.

3. Like the heraldic shields of ancient knights, these morphemes were painted onto the names of scientific technologies to proclaim one’s history and achievements to friends and enemies alike.

4. The historian Robert Proctor at Stanford University calls the suffix ‘-tron’, along with ‘-matic’ and ‘-stat’, embodied symbols.

5. To gain the suffix was to acquire a proud and optimistic emblem of the electronic and atomic age.

A. 45321

B. 54231

C. 32541

D. 23541

Ans: C. 32541

Q.28 The four sentences (labelled 1, 2, 3, 4) given below, when properly sequenced would yield a coherent paragraph. Decide on the proper sequence of the order of the sentences and key in the sequence of the four numbers as your answer.

1. People with dyslexia have difficulty with print-reading, and people with autism spectrum disorder have difficulty with mind-reading.

2. An example of a lost cognitive instinct is mind-reading: our capacity to think of ourselves and others as having beliefs, desires, thoughts and feelings.

3. Mind-reading looks increasingly like literacy, a skill we know for sure is not in our genes, since scripts have been around for only 5,000-6,000 years.

4. Print-reading, like mind-reading varies across cultures, depends heavily on certain parts of the brain, and is subject to developmental disorders.

A. 41523

B. 32415

C. 54123

D. 12345

Ans: A. 41523

Q.29 The passage given below is followed by four alternate summaries. Choose the option that best captures the essence of the passage.

Physics is a pure science that seeks to understand the behaviour of matter without regard to whether it will afford any practical benefit. Engineering is the correlative applied science in which physical theories are put to some specific use, such as building a bridge or a nuclear reactor. Engineers obviously rely heavily on the discoveries of physicists, but an engineer’s knowledge of the world is not the same as the physicist’s knowledge. In fact, an engineer’s know-how will often depend on physical theories that, from the point of view of pure physics, are false. There are some reasons for this. First, theories that are false in the purest and strictest sense are still sometimes very good approximations to the true ones, and often have the added virtue of being much easier to work with. Second, sometimes the true theories apply only under highly idealized conditions which can only be created under controlled experimental situations. The engineer finds that in the real world, theories rejected by physicists yield more accurate predictions than the ones that they accept.

1. The relationship between pure and applied science is strictly linear, with the pure science directing applied science, and never the other way round.

2. The unique task of the engineer is to identify, understand, and interpret the design constraints to produce a successful result.

3. Though engineering draws heavily from pure science, it contributes to knowledge, by incorporating the constraints and conditions in the real world.

4. Engineering and physics fundamentally differ on matters like building a bridge or a nuclear reactor.

Ans: 3. though engineering draws heavily from pure science, it contributes to knowledge, by incorporating the constraints and conditions in the real world.

Q.30 The passage given below is followed by four alternate summaries. Choose the option that best captures the essence of the passage.

A distinguishing feature of language is our ability to refer to absent things, known as displaced reference. A speaker can bring distant referents to mind in the absence of any obvious stimuli. Thoughts, not limited to the here and now, can pop into our heads for unfathomable reasons. This ability to think about distant things necessarily precedes the ability to talk about them. Thought precedes meaningful referential communication. A prerequisite for the emergence of human-like meaningful symbols is that the mental categories they relate to can be invoked even in the absence of immediate stimuli.

1. Thoughts are essential to communication and only humans have the ability to think about objects not present in their surroundings.

2. Thoughts precede all speech acts and these thoughts pop up in our heads even in the absence of any stimulus.

3. Displaced reference is particular to humans and thoughts pop into our heads for no real reason.

4. The ability to think about objects not present in our environment precedes the development of human communication.

Ans: 4. the ability to think about objects not present in our environment precedes the development of human communication.

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