Water Crisis in India- is India Heading to ‘Day Zero’? (Important) (Download PDF)

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About 330 million people in India has been facing severe droughts issues this year. The coal-fired power plants –the major source of electricity in India are at the same time facing huge deficits, resulting in energy crisis.

Map of 54% of India's Ground Water Wells are Decreasing

Map of 54 % of India’s Ground Water Wells Are Decreasing

Map of 54 % of India’s Ground Water Wells are Decreasing

  • The government has appointed armed guards to prevent desperate farmers from stealing water.

Reasons for Water Crisis in India?

  • Sharp decrease in groundwater levels under northern India’s irrigated fields of wheat, rice, and barley.

  • Illegal removal of sand that is important to allow water to percolate in underground aquifers, from river beds.

  • Climate changes and global warming

  • Incidents of increased heat waves.

  • Poor water quality due to arsenic and other chemical contamination.

  • No rain catchment programs

Steps Taken by the Government?

  • Under Deendayal Upadhyaya Gram Jyoti Yojana (DDUGY) separation of agriculture and non-agriculture feeders is being done to facilitate judicious roistering of supply to agricultural and non-agricultural consumers in the rural areas.

  • Water trains to Latur, the worst drought hit area in Maharashtra

  • Water being a state subject, State governments are taking necessary steps in their territories to tackle the issue.

  • Pradhan Mantri Fasal Beema Yojna (PMFBY) - crop insurance scheme is helping the affected farmers.

  • PM Krishi Sinchayee Yojna – Irrigation scheme that includes water harvesting and water conservation measures.

  • Namami Gange- To reduce pollution in the perennial waters of Ganga.

Citizens’ Help?

  • Minimize use of water.

  • Turn off pipes taps after use.

  • Build rain-harvesting tanks at homes.

  • Use efficient irrigation techniques in farms.

State of Water Stored in Dams (Important)?

  • The water storage available in 91 major reservoirs of the country for the week ending on November 23, 2017 was 64 % of total storage capacity of these reservoirs.

  • This percentage was at 66 for the week ending on November 16, 2017.

  • The level of water storage in the week ending on November 23, 2017 was 96 % of the storage of corresponding period of last year and 95 % of storage of average of last ten years.

  • 37 Reservoirs out of these 91 have hydropower benefit with installed capacity of more than 60 MW.

Regional Water Storage Status

Northern Region

  • The northern region includes States of Himachal Pradesh, Punjab, and Rajasthan.

  • There are 6 reservoirs under CWC monitoring having 68 % of total live storage capacity of these reservoirs.

  • Storage during current year is better than the corresponding period of last year and is equal to the average storage of last ten years during the corresponding period.

Eastern Region

  • The Eastern region includes States of Jharkhand, Odisha, West Bengal, and Tripura.

  • There are 15 reservoirs under CWC monitoring having 77 % of total live storage capacity of these reservoirs.

  • Storage during current year is less than the corresponding period of last year but is better than the average storage of last ten years during the corresponding period.

Western Region

  • The Western region includes States of Gujarat and Maharashtra.

  • There are 27 reservoirs under CWC monitoring having 73 % of total live storage capacity of these reservoirs.

  • Storage during current year is less than the storage of last year and is equal to the average storage of last ten years during the corresponding period.

Central Region

  • The Central region includes States of Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Madhya Pradesh, and Chhattisgarh.

  • There are 12 reservoirs under CWC monitoring having 58 % of total live storage capacity of these reservoirs.

  • Storage during current year is less than the storage of last year and is also less than the average storage of last ten years during the corresponding period.

Southern Region

  • The Southern region includes States of Andhra Pradesh, Telangana, AP&TG (two combined projects in both states) Karnataka, Kerala, and Tamil Nadu.

  • There are 31 reservoirs under CWC monitoring having 59 % of total live storage capacity of these reservoirs.

  • Storage during current year is better than the corresponding period of last year but is less than the average storage of last ten years during the corresponding period.

State Storage Summary

  • States having better storage than last year for corresponding period are Himachal Pradesh, West Bengal, Tripura, Uttarakhand, AP&TG (two combined projects in both states), Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, Kerala and Tamil Nadu.

  • States having equal storage than last year for corresponding period is Punjab and Maharashtra.

  • States having lesser storage than last year for corresponding period are Rajasthan, Jharkhand, Odisha, Gujarat, Uttar Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh and Telangana.

Western Cape Province of South Africa Heading to ‘Day Zero’

  • A drought in the Western Cape province of South Africa began in 2015.

  • It is resulting in a severe water shortage in the region, most notably affecting the city of Cape Town.

  • Despite water saving measures, dam levels are predicted to decline to critically low levels.

  • The city has made plans for “Day Zero” in May 2018, when municipal water supply will largely be shut off.

  • If this happens, Cape Town will be the first major city to run out of water.

- Published/Last Modified on: March 26, 2018

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