Yojana April 2019 Handicrafts & Textiles of India (Part-1) (Download PDF)

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Key Topics Included In This Article: Various crafts in India, Khadi’s Journey, Indian Textile Industry, Project ‘The Future is Handmade’, Different Fabrics. Handicrafts & textiles sector is major source of livelihood throughout rural India.

  • Sector is imp. foreign exchange earner, as it has very high export potential. Indian handicrafts & textiles are in great demand abroad w/their unique motifs & colorful textures.
  • Indian handicraft products like shawls, jewellery, bags, wooden carvings, embroidered material are popular at international levels

Magic of Gifted Hands: Empowering Handicraft Artisans

  • Artisans of India are recognized for their craftsmanship, sense of design & color.

  • Cottage industry provided employment to rural artisans & played imp. role in building parallel rural economy.

  • Handicrafts sector plays significant & imp. role in country’s economy. It provides employment to vast segment of crafts persons in rural & semi urban areas & generates substantial foreign exchange for country, while preserving its cultural heritage.

  • Handicrafts have great potential, as they hold key for sustaining not only existing set of millions of artisans spread over length & breadth of country, for increasingly large number of new entrants in crafts activity.

  • There are approx. 70 lakh handicraft artisans in country, which includes 20 lakh artisans related to carpet sector, practicing more than 500 types of crafts like Metal Engraving, Zari Zardosi, Teracotta, Stone Carving, Phulkari, Wood Inlay, Chikankari, Cane & Bamboo, Wooden Toys, Blue Pottery & Kutch Embroidery.

  • 35 crafts are recognized as ‘Endangered Crafts’ like Assamese Jewellery, Rogan Painting, Sanjhi Crafts, Ganjeefa Cards & Chamba Rumal & 92 crafts are registered under ‘Geographical Indication Act’ like Ganjifa cards of Mysore, Kashmir Paper Machie, Madhubani paintings, Kathputlis of Rajasthan, Odisha pattachitra, Varanasi Glass beads & Warli painting of Maharashtra. 56 % of artisans are female.

  • Handicraft sector has challenges of working capital. Poor exposure to new technologies, absence of full market intelligence & institutional framework.

  • Office of Development Commissioner (Handicrafts) is nodal agency in GoI for craft & artisan-based activities. It assist in development, marketing & export of handicraft & promotion of craft forms & skills.

  • Domestic marketing platform is provided by organizing Gandhi Shilp Bazaar, Crafts Bazaar & organizing handicraft exhibitions in prominent shopping malls of country.

  • International Marketing platform is being provided to awardee artisans thru participation in international marketing events.

  • Handicraft awards namely Shilp Guru Award, National Award, National Merit Certificates & Design Innovation award are highest awards for meritorious handicrafts artisans of country.

  • Objective is to give recognition for encouragement to outstanding crafts persons to maintain excellence in craftsmanship & keeping alive old traditions.

  • India is one of imp. suppliers of handicrafts to world market.

  • Top 10 countries contributing to export of handicrafts items (major items being art metal wares, wood wares, hand printed textiles, embroidered & crocheted goods) during last 5 years are USA, UAE, UK, Germany, Netherlands, France, Australia, Japan & Switzerland.

  • India is world’s largest producer & exporter of handmade carpets since 2013 - 14.

  • India’s share is 35 % of total global exports. Abt. 85 % of total production in country is exported to more than 100 countries.

  • USA accounts for 45 % of total exports & Germany, UK & UAE account for 20%.

  • India makes handmade carpets that start from 16 knots per sq. inch to 2500 knots per sq. inch & uses more than 10 types of raw materials & makes carpets in all sizes, shapes & colors.

  • India was made Partner Country in world’s oldest & best exhibition ‘Ambiente’ organized by Germany. More than 4500 companies from 80 countries participated.

  • National Handicrafts & Handloom Museum at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi is popularly known as Crafts Museum.

Sustaining Artisans Economically

  • Kutch Embroidery of Gujarat or Zari-Zardozi & Chikankari of UP, wooden toys of Karnataka or bamboo craft of Assam, puppets of Rajasthan or Sikki, Tikuli & Madhubani arts of Bihar; are traditional arts of respective provinces & imp. source of alternative income for artisans. This is one of those market segments that have led India to establish its distinct identity in international market.

  • Handicrafts become imp. source of livelihood for large chunk of Indian population. There were 68.86 lakh artisans as per census of handicrafts conducted during 11th 5 year plan.

  • Sector provides employment in various forms to artisans.

  • Export segment of handicrafts is emerging as potential source of foreign exchange earnings.

  • Export Promotion Council for Handicrafts (EPCH) organises product-specific shows & ‘Indian Handicrafts & Gifts Fair’ bi-annually.

  • Market Development Assistance (M. D. A) & Market Access Initiative (M. A. I) envision better marketing of these products thru fairs, exhibitions & producers-buyers meets.

  • ‘India Handloom Bazaar’, online marketing portal is based on marketing of handicrafts thru facilitating direct interaction b/w buyers & sellers.

  • Focus is on artisans & their enterprises to utilise facilities enabling them to contribute towards economy & socio-economic upliftment of community.

  • Artisans & their associations should move forward to get Geographical Indication (GI) tag to enhance credibility of their products.

  • GI tag is sign on product showing its region of origin. Some of handicrafts which have received GI tag are Kangra paintings, Varanasi brocades & saris, Bustar wooden craft, Villianur terracotta works etc.

Contributing to Economic Growth

  • Tirupati (Andhra Pradesh) & Raghurajpur (Odisha) are separated by over 1100 kms. Project of linking ‘Textiles with Tourism’ brings them closer. Project aiming to give textiles & handicrafts new dimension.

  • Textile sector is one of oldest industries in India estimated around US $150 billion & expected to reach US $250 billion soon. It contributed 7 % of industry output, 15 % in export earnings & over 2 % in GDP of India in 2017 - 18.

  • Overall textile exports during fiscal year 2017 - 18 stood at US $39.2 billion.

  • Textile & handicrafts are key source of employment. Handloom sector provides direct & indirect employment to 43 lakh weavers & allied workers. There are 68.86 lakh handicraft artisans.

  • Handloom & handicrafts sector provide about 111 lakh employment both in organized & unorganized sector.

Handicrafts Sector

  • To organize & standardize Indian handicrafts, approx. 22.85 lakhs artisans are trained under ‘Pahchan’ initiatives. 35 crafts are identified as endangered crafts & 92 crafts are registered under Geographical Indication Act.

  • For standardization of carpets, carpet rating scheme is formulated.

  • There is direct marketing portal for handicrafts artisans to provide direct market access facility to genuine handicrafts artisans including tribal artisans working in far-flung areas.

  • Any handicraft artisan registered under ‘Pahchan’ can utilize this portal for marketing their products.

Cotton

  • Cotton is most imp. component of textile & handicraft sector. In order to protect interest of cotton farmers, MSP is increased for 2018 - 19 by 28% & 26 % for Medium Staple Cotton & Long Staple Cotton.

  • To pass on benefit of MSP & to ensure remunerative price to large section of cotton farmers, there is nodal agency called Cotton Corporation of India (CCI).

Challenges for Textile Sector

One of key challenges which India faces is duty disadvantage of upto 9.6 % in imp. consuming markets like European Union as compared to competing countries viz. Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Turkey & Pakistan which have zero duty access.

Women, Hunar and Looms of Hope

  • Ahilyabai was her name, a simple girl from a town called Beed in Maharashtra.

  • Burhanpur known for its rich tradition of handloom weaving.

  • She would create pattern of weave from various moods & her shapes of Narmada wave.

  • Maharani Ahilyabai Holkar, thus, introduced weaving in 1765 to provide a sustainable means of livelihood for people of her town.

  • Weavers from Mandu & Burhanpur trained them day & night.

  • Her vision & foresight is etched all over Maheshwar town- along ghats, in temples, in her palace in exquisite stone carvings stone carving which become design guide for thousands of weavers.

  • They wove these designs on looms creating exquisite Maheshwari saree.

  • Rehwa centre is built next to Ahilyabai Palace, just above Ghats.

  • Its location is symbolic it was from here that handloom weaving entered portals of Maheshwar.

  • Weavers I met here were full of energy & ideas.

  • They were proud that they made a decent living through their skills.

  • Three decades ago there were less than 25 looms left in Maheshwar.

  • Weavers began to move out in search of work.

  • Then, in 1979, scion of royal family, Richard Holkar, started into dying weave of Maheshwar.

  • Holkar retained traditional designs but introduced new colours & changed nauwari (nine yard) sari to six yards.

  • Today, there are 1750 looms in Maheshwar.

  • They have diversified into dress materials, dupattas, furnishings.

  • Their children attend crèche & school run by Rehwa.

  • Ahilya School in located next door, in a large building open to children of all weavers.

  • Mid-day meals are provided.

  • There is a Health Centre w/doctors & visiting specialists for Rehwa weavers & their families.

  • Society provides every employee w/a two room house & two looms.

  • Most of them have been around for last 15 - 16 years.

  • They work from 10 am to 5 pm & earn between Rs. 100 & 150 per day.

  • When they retire or perchance get disabled they receive a monthly pension of Rs. 500 to Rs. 1000.

  • This explains why Rehwa sarees are costlier; these social costs are also built in.

Story began like this

  • Handloom centres – Benaras, Maheshwar, Pochampally, Paithan Kota, Kanchipuram, Barabanki.

  • I had seen artisans at work in Jodhpur, Molela, Mayurbhanj, Badohi, Chamba.

  • I told him story of Dhuke Ki Malmal, of how an entire bale of Muslin could be passed through a ring.

  • And how loyal servants of empire cut off thumbs of weavers, so they would not create competition for mills of Birmingham.

  • Lives of lakhs on this decentralized & dispersed sector which embodies traditional wisdom, cultural wealth & secular ethos of our polity

Crossing the Seven Seas

  • Small scale industries – including handicrafts play major role in development of economy of both developed & developing countries equally.

  • Besides being employment generator, handicraft industry is economically viable, because of low capital investments while potential for export of various handicraft products is considerably high. It is imp. foreign exchange earner for our country.

  • Some of imp. hubs of Indian handicrafts industry are Moradabad (noted for its brass artifacts), Saharanpur (noted for its wooden artifacts), Ferozabad (noted for its exclusive glass handicrafts) in UP.

Image of Indian Handicrafts Industry

Image of Indian Handicrafts Industry

Image of Indian Handicrafts Industry

  • Other imp. handicraft producing hubs are Jaipur (famous for its exotic quilts), Bagru & Sanganer (printed textiles) & Jodhpur (famous for unique wooden & wrought iron furniture), in north western Rajasthan.

Image of Handicraft Producing Hubs

Image of Handicraft Producing Hubs

Image of Handicraft Producing Hubs

  • Kutch needs special mention because of its exotic embroidered handicrafts & Narsapur (AP) famous for its lace handicrafts.

  • Demand for handicraft sector will increase in future due to developing fashion industry & sectors like retail & real estate that offer enormous demand for handicraft products.

  • E-Commerce & Internet have emerged as prominent distribution channels to market & sell handicraft products.

Indian Textile Industry

  • Indian Textile Industry is largest in world w/large raw material base & manufacturing strength across value chain.

  • Domestic textile & apparel industry contributes 2 % to India’s GDP & accounts for 14 % of industrial production, 27 % of country’s foreign exchange inflows & 13 % of country’s export earnings.

  • Textile sector in India is dominated by women workers, w/70 % of workforce being women. In Indian textile & apparel sector, sub sectors of weaving, processing & garmenting are fragmented & lack requisite scale for success in global markets.

  • India – 2nd largest producer of silk. Mill sector w/3400 textile mills having installed capacity of more than 50 million spindles & 842,000 rotors is 2nd largest in world.

  • India producing around 18 % of world’s silk. Mulberry, Eri, Tussar & Muga are main types of silk produced in country.

  • India – largest producer of cotton in world w/production of 345 lakh bales in 2016 - 17 & 2nd largest exporter after China.

  • International brands like Marks & Spencer, JC Penny & Gap acquired most of their fabrics from India.

  • Indian textile industry covers 61 % of international textile market & over 20 % of global market.

Indian Textile Industry

  • Indian Textile Industry is largest in world w/large raw material base & manufacturing strength across value chain.

  • Domestic textile & apparel industry contributes 2 % to India’s GDP & accounts for 14 % of industrial production, 27 % of country’s foreign exchange inflows & 13 % of country’s export earnings.

  • Textile sector in India is dominated by women workers, w/70 % of workforce being women. In Indian textile & apparel sector, sub sectors of weaving, processing & garmenting are fragmented & lack requisite scale for success in global markets.

  • India – 2nd largest producer of silk. Mill sector w/3400 textile mills having installed capacity of more than 50 million spindles & 842,000 rotors is 2nd largest in world.

  • India producing around 18 % of world’s silk. Mulberry, Eri, Tussar & Muga are main types of silk produced in country.

  • India – largest producer of cotton in world w/production of 345 lakh bales in 2016 - 17 & 2nd largest exporter after China.

  • International brands like Marks & Spencer, JC Penny & Gap acquired most of their fabrics from India.

  • Indian textile industry covers 61 % of international textile market & over 20 % of global market.

Conclusion & Way Forward

  • India enjoys unique advantage of having abundant raw materials & presence of manufacturing in all segments of textile value chain.

  • Time has come for industry to discard outdated technology & modernize its machinery to be globally competitive.

  • Industry needs to focus on innovation & value addition for improving global competitiveness of Indian textiles & apparels.

  • Affordable raw material & labour & great strides in textile technology could make India preferred & formidable destination for foreign investment in textile & garment business.

  • India’s textile about handlooms, subsector could play big role in forging global luxury industry ahead. Industry’s focus should be to recreate inherent talent of Indian weavers.

  • Khadi – tour de force in textile sector, providing perfect context for meaningful discourse. It narrates universal tale of how handmade fabric can find soul-stirring reference in present highly volatile & fast paced environment. Key Topics Included In This Article

    • Various crafts in India

    • Khadi’s Journey

    • Indian Textile Industry

    • Project ‘The Future is Handmade’

    • Different Fabrics

    • Handicrafts & textiles sector is major source of livelihood throughout rural India.

    • Sector is imp. foreign exchange earner, as it has very high export potential. Indian handicrafts & textiles are in great demand abroad w/their unique motifs & colorful textures.

    • Indian handicraft products like shawls, jewellery, bags, wooden carvings, embroidered material are popular at international levels

    Magic of Gifted Hands: Empowering Handicraft Artisans

    • Artisans of India are recognized for their craftsmanship, sense of design & color.

    • Cottage industry provided employment to rural artisans & played imp. role in building parallel rural economy.

    • Handicrafts sector plays significant & imp. role in country’s economy. It provides employment to vast segment of crafts persons in rural & semi urban areas & generates substantial foreign exchange for country, while preserving its cultural heritage.

    • Handicrafts have great potential, as they hold key for sustaining not only existing set of millions of artisans spread over length & breadth of country, for increasingly large number of new entrants in crafts activity.

    • There are approx. 70 lakh handicraft artisans in country, which includes 20 lakh artisans related to carpet sector, practicing more than 500 types of crafts like Metal Engraving, Zari Zardosi, Teracotta, Stone Carving, Phulkari, Wood Inlay, Chikankari, Cane & Bamboo, Wooden Toys, Blue Pottery & Kutch Embroidery.

    • 35 crafts are recognized as ‘Endangered Crafts’ like Assamese Jewellery, Rogan Painting, Sanjhi Crafts, Ganjeefa Cards & Chamba Rumal & 92 crafts are registered under ‘Geographical Indication Act’ like Ganjifa cards of Mysore, Kashmir Paper Machie, Madhubani paintings, Kathputlis of Rajasthan, Odisha pattachitra, Varanasi Glass beads & Warli painting of Maharashtra. 56 % of artisans are female.

    • Handicraft sector has challenges of working capital. Poor exposure to new technologies, absence of full market intelligence & institutional framework.

    • Office of Development Commissioner (Handicrafts) is nodal agency in GoI for craft & artisan-based activities. It assist in development, marketing & export of handicraft & promotion of craft forms & skills.

    • Domestic marketing platform is provided by organizing Gandhi Shilp Bazaar, Crafts Bazaar & organizing handicraft exhibitions in prominent shopping malls of country.

    • International Marketing platform is being provided to awardee artisans thru participation in international marketing events.

    • Handicraft awards namely Shilp Guru Award, National Award, National Merit Certificates & Design Innovation award are highest awards for meritorious handicrafts artisans of country.

    • Objective is to give recognition for encouragement to outstanding crafts persons to maintain excellence in craftsmanship & keeping alive old traditions.

    • India is one of imp. suppliers of handicrafts to world market.

    • Top 10 countries contributing to export of handicrafts items (major items being art metal wares, wood wares, hand printed textiles, embroidered & crocheted goods) during last 5 years are USA, UAE, UK, Germany, Netherlands, France, Australia, Japan & Switzerland.

    • India is world’s largest producer & exporter of handmade carpets since 2013 - 14.

    • India’s share is 35 % of total global exports. Abt. 85 % of total production in country is exported to more than 100 countries.

    • USA accounts for 45 % of total exports & Germany, UK & UAE account for 20%.

    • India makes handmade carpets that start from 16 knots per sq. inch to 2500 knots per sq. inch & uses more than 10 types of raw materials & makes carpets in all sizes, shapes & colors.

    • India was made Partner Country in world’s oldest & best exhibition ‘Ambiente’ organized by Germany. More than 4500 companies from 80 countries participated.

    • National Handicrafts & Handloom Museum at Pragati Maidan, New Delhi is popularly known as Crafts Museum.

    Sustaining Artisans Economically

    • Kutch Embroidery of Gujarat or Zari-Zardozi & Chikankari of UP, wooden toys of Karnataka or bamboo craft of Assam, puppets of Rajasthan or Sikki, Tikuli & Madhubani arts of Bihar; are traditional arts of respective provinces & imp. source of alternative income for artisans. This is one of those market segments that have led India to establish its distinct identity in international market.

    • Handicrafts become imp. source of livelihood for large chunk of Indian population. There were 68.86 lakh artisans as per census of handicrafts conducted during 11th 5 year plan.

    • Sector provides employment in various forms to artisans.

    • Export segment of handicrafts is emerging as potential source of foreign exchange earnings.

    • Export Promotion Council for Handicrafts (EPCH) organises product-specific shows & ‘Indian Handicrafts & Gifts Fair’ bi-annually.

    • Market Development Assistance (M. D. A) & Market Access Initiative (M. A. I) envision better marketing of these products thru fairs, exhibitions & producers-buyers meets.

    • ‘India Handloom Bazaar’, online marketing portal is based on marketing of handicrafts thru facilitating direct interaction b/w buyers & sellers.

    • Focus is on artisans & their enterprises to utilise facilities enabling them to contribute towards economy & socio-economic upliftment of community.

    • Artisans & their associations should move forward to get Geographical Indication (GI) tag to enhance credibility of their products.

    • GI tag is sign on product showing its region of origin. Some of handicrafts which have received GI tag are Kangra paintings, Varanasi brocades & saris, Bustar wooden craft, Villianur terracotta works etc.

    Contributing to Economic Growth

    • Tirupati (Andhra Pradesh) & Raghurajpur (Odisha) are separated by over 1100 kms. Project of linking ‘Textiles with Tourism’ brings them closer. Project aiming to give textiles & handicrafts new dimension.

    • Textile sector is one of oldest industries in India estimated around US $150 billion & expected to reach US $250 billion soon. It contributed 7 % of industry output, 15 % in export earnings & over 2 % in GDP of India in 2017 - 18.

    • Overall textile exports during fiscal year 2017 - 18 stood at US $39.2 billion.

    • Textile & handicrafts are key source of employment. Handloom sector provides direct & indirect employment to 43 lakh weavers & allied workers. There are 68.86 lakh handicraft artisans.

    • Handloom & handicrafts sector provide about 111 lakh employment both in organized & unorganized sector.

    Handicrafts Sector

    • To organize & standardize Indian handicrafts, approx. 22.85 lakhs artisans are trained under ‘Pahchan’ initiatives. 35 crafts are identified as endangered crafts & 92 crafts are registered under Geographical Indication Act.

    • For standardization of carpets, carpet rating scheme is formulated.

    • There is direct marketing portal for handicrafts artisans to provide direct market access facility to genuine handicrafts artisans including tribal artisans working in far-flung areas.

    • Any handicraft artisan registered under ‘Pahchan’ can utilize this portal for marketing their products.

    Cotton

    • Cotton is most imp. component of textile & handicraft sector. In order to protect interest of cotton farmers, MSP is increased for 2018 - 19 by 28% & 26 % for Medium Staple Cotton & Long Staple Cotton.

    • To pass on benefit of MSP & to ensure remunerative price to large section of cotton farmers, there is nodal agency called Cotton Corporation of India (CCI).

    Challenges for Textile Sector

    One of key challenges which India faces is duty disadvantage of upto 9.6 % in imp. consuming markets like European Union as compared to competing countries viz. Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Turkey & Pakistan which have zero duty access.

    Women, Hunar and Looms of Hope

    • Ahilyabai was her name, a simple girl from a town called Beed in Maharashtra.

    • Burhanpur known for its rich tradition of handloom weaving.

    • She would create pattern of weave from various moods & her shapes of Narmada wave.

    • Maharani Ahilyabai Holkar, thus, introduced weaving in 1765 to provide a sustainable means of livelihood for people of her town.

    • Weavers from Mandu & Burhanpur trained them day & night.

    • Her vision & foresight is etched all over Maheshwar town- along ghats, in temples, in her palace in exquisite stone carvings stone carving which become design guide for thousands of weavers.

    • They wove these designs on looms creating exquisite Maheshwari saree.

    • Rehwa centre is built next to Ahilyabai Palace, just above Ghats.

    • Its location is symbolic it was from here that handloom weaving entered portals of Maheshwar.

    • Weavers I met here were full of energy & ideas.

    • They were proud that they made a decent living through their skills.

    • Three decades ago there were less than 25 looms left in Maheshwar.

    • Weavers began to move out in search of work.

    • Then, in 1979, scion of royal family, Richard Holkar, started into dying weave of Maheshwar.

    • Holkar retained traditional designs but introduced new colours & changed nauwari (nine yard) sari to six yards.

    • Today, there are 1750 looms in Maheshwar.

    • They have diversified into dress materials, dupattas, furnishings.

    • Their children attend crèche & school run by Rehwa.

    • Ahilya School in located next door, in a large building open to children of all weavers.

    • Mid-day meals are provided.

    • There is a Health Centre w/doctors & visiting specialists for Rehwa weavers & their families.

    • Society provides every employee w/a two room house & two looms.

    • Most of them have been around for last 15 - 16 years.

    • They work from 10 am to 5 pm & earn between Rs. 100 & 150 per day.

    • When they retire or perchance get disabled they receive a monthly pension of Rs. 500 to Rs. 1000.

    • This explains why Rehwa sarees are costlier; these social costs are also built in.

    Story began like this

    • Handloom centres – Benaras, Maheshwar, Pochampally, Paithan Kota, Kanchipuram, Barabanki.

    • I had seen artisans at work in Jodhpur, Molela, Mayurbhanj, Badohi, Chamba.

    • I told him story of Dhuke Ki Malmal, of how an entire bale of Muslin could be passed through a ring.

    • And how loyal servants of empire cut off thumbs of weavers, so they would not create competition for mills of Birmingham.

    • Lives of lakhs on this decentralized & dispersed sector which embodies traditional wisdom, cultural wealth & secular ethos of our polity

    Crossing the Seven Seas

    • Small scale industries – including handicrafts play major role in development of economy of both developed & developing countries equally.

    • Besides being employment generator, handicraft industry is economically viable, because of low capital investments while potential for export of various handicraft products is considerably high. It is imp. foreign exchange earner for our country.

    • Some of imp. hubs of Indian handicrafts industry are Moradabad (noted for its brass artifacts), Saharanpur (noted for its wooden artifacts), Ferozabad (noted for its exclusive glass handicrafts) in UP.

    • Other imp. handicraft producing hubs are Jaipur (famous for its exotic quilts), Bagru & Sanganer (printed textiles) & Jodhpur (famous for unique wooden & wrought iron furniture), in north western Rajasthan.

    • Kutch needs special mention because of its exotic embroidered handicrafts & Narsapur (AP) famous for its lace handicrafts.

    • Demand for handicraft sector will increase in future due to developing fashion industry & sectors like retail & real estate that offer enormous demand for handicraft products.

    • E-Commerce & Internet have emerged as prominent distribution channels to market & sell handicraft products.

    Indian Textile Industry

    • Indian Textile Industry is largest in world w/large raw material base & manufacturing strength across value chain.

    • Domestic textile & apparel industry contributes 2 % to India’s GDP & accounts for 14 % of industrial production, 27 % of country’s foreign exchange inflows & 13 % of country’s export earnings.

    • Textile sector in India is dominated by women workers, w/70 % of workforce being women. In Indian textile & apparel sector, sub sectors of weaving, processing & garmenting are fragmented & lack requisite scale for success in global markets.

    • India – 2nd largest producer of silk. Mill sector w/3400 textile mills having installed capacity of more than 50 million spindles & 842,000 rotors is 2nd largest in world.

    • India producing around 18 % of world’s silk. Mulberry, Eri, Tussar & Muga are main types of silk produced in country.

    • India – largest producer of cotton in world w/production of 345 lakh bales in 2016 - 17 & 2nd largest exporter after China.

    • International brands like Marks & Spencer, JC Penny & Gap acquired most of their fabrics from India.

    • Indian textile industry covers 61 % of international textile market & over 20 % of global market.

    Indian Textile Industry

    • Indian Textile Industry is largest in world w/large raw material base & manufacturing strength across value chain.

    • Domestic textile & apparel industry contributes 2 % to India’s GDP & accounts for 14 % of industrial production, 27 % of country’s foreign exchange inflows & 13 % of country’s export earnings.

    • Textile sector in India is dominated by women workers, w/70 % of workforce being women. In Indian textile & apparel sector, sub sectors of weaving, processing & garmenting are fragmented & lack requisite scale for success in global markets.

    • India – 2nd largest producer of silk. Mill sector w/3400 textile mills having installed capacity of more than 50 million spindles & 842,000 rotors is 2nd largest in world.

    • India producing around 18 % of world’s silk. Mulberry, Eri, Tussar & Muga are main types of silk produced in country.

    • India – largest producer of cotton in world w/production of 345 lakh bales in 2016 - 17 & 2nd largest exporter after China.

    • International brands like Marks & Spencer, JC Penny & Gap acquired most of their fabrics from India.

    • Indian textile industry covers 61 % of international textile market & over 20 % of global market.

    Conclusion & Way Forward

    • India enjoys unique advantage of having abundant raw materials & presence of manufacturing in all segments of textile value chain.

    • Time has come for industry to discard outdated technology & modernize its machinery to be globally competitive.

    • Industry needs to focus on innovation & value addition for improving global competitiveness of Indian textiles & apparels.

    • Affordable raw material & labour & great strides in textile technology could make India preferred & formidable destination for foreign investment in textile & garment business.

    • India’s textile about handlooms, subsector could play big role in forging global luxury industry ahead. Industry’s focus should be to recreate inherent talent of Indian weavers.

    • Khadi – tour de force in textile sector, providing perfect context for meaningful discourse. It narrates universal tale of how handmade fabric can find soul-stirring reference in present highly volatile & fast paced environment.

- Published/Last Modified on: May 15, 2019

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