SAT Questions and Answers Practice Test Paper-2 Important Questions Section a

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Section - A

Time - 25 minutes

20 Questions

A bill is the form used for most legislation in the United State Congress. Only constitutional amendments and procedural issues affecting the House and Senate are adopted by a resolution, rather than a bill. Bills can be written to be permanent or temporary, general or special. A bill originating in the House of Representatives is designated by the letters “H. R. ,” signifying “House of Representatives,” followed by a number that it retains throughout all its parliamentary stages. The number on the bill is determined by the order in which it was submitted during a particular session. Bills are presented to the president for action when approved in identical form by both the House of Representatives and the Senate.

1. From the passage, it can be inferred that a bill that is designated as H. R. 1 is the first bill

(A) Voted upon by the House of Representatives in a particular session of Congress.

(B) Submitted to the House of Representatives in a particular session of Congress.

(C) Sent to the Senate from the House of Representatives in a particular session of Congress.

(D) Originating in the House of Representatives signed by the President in a particular session of Congress.

(E) Debated on the floor of the House of Representatives in a particular session of Congress.

Ans. (B) Submitted to the House of Representatives in a particular session of Congress.

2. It is implied in the passage that once a bill is passed in the House of Representatives that it might be sent to which of the following two places?

(A) Senate, conference committee

(B) Senate, House committee

(C) Senate, president

(D) President, Supreme Court

(E) President, congress

Ans. (C) Senate, president

Native American views of nature have important parallels in contemporary ecology. Through traditional customs and symbols like the medicine wheel, a circular arrangement of stones often interpreted as representing the relationship between Earth, air, water, and fire, Native Americans have long recognized and celebrated the connectedness among all natural things. Indeed, the Native American view of the world has always been consistent with that of Earth ecology – that Earth is a single system of interconnected parts.

3. The symbol of the medicine wheel is given as a (n)

(A) Illustration of how Native Americans view the Earth as an interconnected system.

(B) Example of the Native American understanding of the four elements.

(C) Example of the interrelatedness of the four basic elements.

(D) Critique of contemporary ecological understandings of the Earth.

(E) Contrast to contemporary ecological understandings of the Earth.

Ans. (A) Illustration of how Native Americans view the Earth as an interconnected system.

4. Given what the passage states about Native American views of nature, which of the following scenarios most accords with a Native American view?

(A) Studying a microorganism removed from its habitat.

(B) Studying Earth through satellite images.

(C) Studying only animals and substances with spiritual symbolism.

(D) Studying a specific organism՚s interrelationships with its habitat.

(E) Studying a habitat as a whole.

Ans. (E) Studying a habitat as a whole

Questions are based on the following passage.

This passage is about Aaron Copland, one of the most celebrated American composers.

Copland՚S Music of the Late 1920s Culminates
Line No.Passage
5Copland՚s music of the late 1920s culminates in two key works, both uncompromising in their modernism: the symphonic Ode of 1929 and the Piano variations of 1930. The fate of these
10Composites contrasts sharply. While the Piano variations is not often performed in concert, it is well known to pianists because, although it does contain virtuoso passages, even those of very
15Modest ability can “play at” the work in private. It represents the twentieth-century continuation of the great tradition of keyboard variations – – the tradition that produced such works as
20The Batch Goldberg Variations, and Beethoven՚s Diabelli Variations. Copland՚s symphonic Ode, on the other hand, remains almost unknown: An intense symphonic movement, it was
25Considered unperformable by the conductor Serge Koussevitzky, otherwise the most potent American champion of Copland՚s work during the first half of the century. Koussevitzky did perform a
30Revised version in 1932; but even with a second, more extensive revision in 1955, the Ode is seldom played. It is Copland՚s single longest orchestral movement.

Perhaps as a reaction to the performance

35problems of the symphonic Ode, Copland՚s next two orchestral works deal in shorter units of time: the Short symphony of 1933 requires fifteen minutes for three movements and the
40Six Statements for orchestra of 1935 last only nineteen minutes. Yet, in fact, these works were more complex than the Ode; in particular, the wiry, agile rhythms of the opening movement of the Short
45Symphony proved too much for both the conductors Serge Koussevitzky and Leopold Stokowski. In the end it was Carlos Chavez and the Orquesta Sinfonica de Mexico who gave the Short
50symphony its premiere.

It may have been partly Copland՚s friendship with Carlos Chavez that drew him to Mexico. Copland first visited Mexico in 1932 and returned frequently

55In later years. His initial delight in the country is related in his letter of January 13,1933, to Mary Lescaze, in which he glowingly describes the Mexican people and the Mexican landscape. His interest
60In Mexico is also reflected in his music, including El Salon Mexico (1936) and the Three Latin American Sketches (1972) .

Mexico was not Copland՚s only Latin

65American interest. A 1941 trip to Havana suggested his Danzon Cubano. By the early 1940s he was friends with south American composers such as Jacobo Ficher, and in 1947 he toured South
70America for the State Department. (Some of the folk music he heard in Rio de Janeiro on this trip appears in his later works.) Copland in fact envisioned “American music” as being music of the
75Americas as a whole. His own use of Mexican material in the mid-1930s helped make his style more accessible to listeners not willing to accept the challenges of modern symphonic music.

5. What is the author՚s tone toward Copland՚s music?

(A) Strident skepticism

(B) Clinical objectivity

(C) Respectful description

(D) Qualified enthusiasm

(E) Unqualified praise

Ans. (C) Respectful description

6. The word “virtuoso” in line 10 could best be replaced with

(A) Ostentatious.

(B) Intricate

(C) Raucous

(D) Abstruse

(E) Publicized.

Ans. (C) Raucous

Explanation:

The virtuoso passages are passages only a virtuoso could play – essentially, difficult. Eliminate Publicized. There is no negative judgment of that quality in the passage. That eliminates all but Raucous, which is the answer.

7. In the first paragraph the author states that Symphonic Ode and Piano Variations had different fates in that

(A) One was largely ignored while the other was almost universally praised.

(B) One, a simpler piece, won popular acclaim, while the other, a more complex piece, won critical acclaim.

(C) One, a simpler piece, became widely known by pianists, but the other, a more complex piece, remained largely unknown.

(D) One, featuring Mexican influences, was popular in Latin America, and the other, a modernist piece, was popular in the United States.

(E) Both were initially acclaimed but only one became part of Copland՚s corpus of beloved works.

Ans. (C) one, a simpler piece, became widely known by pianists, but the other, a more complex piece, remained largely unknown.

8. Koussevitzky is mentioned as an example of a (n)

(A) American conductor who admired Copland՚s work, but nonetheless found some pieces too difficult to perform.

(B) Friend of Copland՚s who agreed to perform his less popular works.

(C) European composer who took issue with the difficulty of Copland՚s work but was unable to play it.

(D) Musician who appreciated Copland՚s work but was unable to play it.

(E) European conductor who performed Copland՚s work.

Ans. (A) American conductor who admired Copland՚s work, but nonetheless found some pieces too difficult to perform.

9. The author of the passage believes that Copland՚s works immediately subsequent to the Symphonic Ode were possibly written.

(A) For Copland՚s new relationship with Carlos Chavez and the Orquesta Sinfonica de Mexico.

(B) To be simpler than the Symphonic Ode, on account of its difficulty in being performed.

(C) To be shorter than the Symphonic Ode, because the Ode was not being performed.

(D) To demand even more of conductors and musicians attempting to play Copland՚s music.

(E) To reflect Copland՚s new interest in Latin American.

Ans. (C) To be shorter than the Symphonic Ode, because the Ode was not being performed.

10. In the sentence beginning “Yet, in fact, these works …” in lines 37 – 43 [second paragraph] , the author suggests that

(A) Parts of the Short Symphony simply weren՚t melodic enough to engage audiences.

(B) The Statements were too brief to warrant a formal performance.

(C) Even those who admired Copland՚s work lost patience with the Short Symphony and Statements.

(D) The Statements and Short Symphony determined which performers were truly excellent and which were truly excellent and which were mediocre.

(E) The Short Symphony had melodies that were too quick to be played even by famous musicians.

Ans. (E) The Short Symphony had melodies that were too quick to be played even by famous musicians.

11. The author suggests that Copland believed Latin American music

(A) was unfamiliar enough to a North American audience that he needed to introduce them to it.

(B) was different enough from North American music that incorporating aspects of it would make his music unique and exciting.

(C) Influenced and was influenced by North American music.

(D) Primarily originated in Mexico and Cuba.

(E) Embodied the polar opposite of modernist aesthetics.

Ans. (C) Influenced and was influenced by North American music.

12. The sentence beginning “His own use of Mexican material …” in lines 71 – 75 suggests that the modernist music which also influenced Copland՚s compositions was

(A) Superior in quality to his Latin American influences.

(B) Dry and passionless.

(C) Technically more challenging to perform.

(D) Inaccessible but rewarding.

(E) Outmoded by the 1930s.

Ans. (D) Inaccessible but rewarding.

Questions are based on the following passage.

The following passage was written by Ed Lu, an astronaut, while a crew member of the International Space Station.

Think – Our Orbit
Line No.Passage
5Whenever I get a chance, I spend time just observing the planet below. It turns out you can see a lot more from up here than you might expect. First off, we aren՚t as far away as some people
10Think – our orbit is only about 240 miles above the surface of the Earth. While this is high enough to see that the Earth is round, we are still just barely skimming the surface when you consider that the
15Diameter of the Earth is over 8,000 miles.

So how much of the Earth can we see at one time? When you are standing on the ground, the horizon is a few miles away. When in a tall building, the

20Horizon can be as far as about 40 miles.

From the International Space Station, the distance to the horizon is over 1,000 miles. So from horizon to horizon, the section of the Earth you can see at any

25One time is a patch about 2,000 miles across, almost enough to see the entire United States at once. It isn՚t exactly seeing the Earth like a big blue marble, it՚s more like having your face up against
30A big blue beach ball. When I look out a window that faces straight down, it is actually pretty hard to see the horizon – you need to get your face very close to the window. So what you see out a
35Window like that is a moving patch of ground (or water) .

From the time a place on the ground comes into view until it disappears over the horizon is only a few minutes, since

40We are travelling 300 miles per minute. When looking out a sideward facing window, you can see the horizon of the Earth against the black background of space. The horizon is distinctly curved.
45The edge of the Earth isn՚t distinct but rather is smeared out due to the atmo-sphere. Here you can get a feel for how relatively thin the atmosphere is com-pared to the Earth as a whole. I can see
50That the width of the atmosphere on the horizon is about 1 degree in angular size, which is about the width of your index finger held out at arm՚s length. There really isn՚t a sharp boundary to the
55Atmosphere, but it gets rapidly thinner the higher you go. Not many airplanes can fly higher than about 10 miles, and the highest mountains are only about 6 miles high. Above about 30 miles there is
60Very little air to speak of, but at night you can see a faint glow from what little air there is at that height.

Since we orbit at an altitude about 40 times higher than the tallest mountain,

65The surface of the Earth is pretty smooth from our perspective. A good way to imagine our view is to stand up and look down at your feet. Imagine that your eyes are where the International Space Station
70Is orbiting, and the floor is the surface of the Earth. The atmosphere would be about 6 inches high, and the height of the tallest mountain is less than 2 inches, or about the height of the tops of your feet.
75Almost all of the people below you would live in the first one quarter of an inch from the floor. The horizon of the Earth is a little over 20 feet away from where you are standing. If you are standing on top
Of Denver, then about 15 feet to one side you can see San Francisco, and about 15 feet to the other side you can see Chicago.

13. The primary purpose of this passage is to

(A) Provide a layperson՚s account of the Space Station՚s motion over the Earth.

(B) Explain the relationship between the diameter of the Earth and the thickness of the Earth՚s atmosphere.

(C) Answer the imagined question, “What do astronauts see from space?”

(D) Give a glimpse of some of the daily activities of astronauts in space.

(E) Discuss the thickness and composition of the atmosphere.

Ans. (C) Answer the imagined question, “What do astronauts see from space?”

14. The second half of the second paragraph is primarily concerned with

(A) How one՚s location affects one՚s visual horizon.

(B) The thickness and density of the atmosphere.

(C) The speed of the International Space Station.

(D) The visual horizon from atop a Station.

(E) Being able to see all the Earth at once.

Ans. (E) Being able to see all the Earth at once.

15. The author compares the view of the Earth from a downward – facing window in the International Space Station to

(A) Holding a blue marble at arm՚s length.

(B) Having your face up – close to a big blue beach ball.

(C) Looking at the tips of your shoes when standing up.

(D) Looking at an object that is on the ground fifteen feet away when you are standing up.

(E) The view from a high – flying plane.

Ans. (B) Having your face up – close to a big blue beach ball.

16. In the passage, the author contrasts the view from a window looking “straight down” with the view from

(A) The observational deck.

(B) A sideward – facing window.

(C) A passenger airliner.

(D) A window looking “Straight up.”

(E) The circular windows on the space station.

Ans. (B) A sideward – facing window.

17. The “faint glow” at night that the author speaks of in the passage comes from

(A) Low-lying atmosphere.

(B) The other edges of the atmosphere.

(C) The eastern horizon of the Earth just before sunrise.

(D) Haze from foreign particulates in the atmosphere.

(E) The sum reflecting off aircraft in the high atmosphere.

Ans. (B) The other edges of the atmosphere.

18. In the last paragraph the author provides the thought exercise with the reader՚s height primarily to

(A) Demonstrate the distance from Denver to San Francisco.

(B) Give the reader a concrete sense of the proportions involved in looking down from the space station.

(C) Point out that most humans live at a low altitude relative to the height of the atmosphere.

(D) Illustrate the expansion of one՚s horizon at high altitudes.

(E) Provide visual details of his activities in space.

Ans. (B) Give the reader a concrete sense of the proportions involved in looking down from the space station.

19. The tone of the passage is best described as

(A) Fairly technical.

(B) Highly professional.

(C) Refreshingly irreverent.

(D) Engagingly conversational.

(E) Lyrically impassioned.

Ans. (D) Engagingly conversational.

20. From the passage as a whole, it can be inferred that the astronauts՚ training

(A) Did not prepare them for their free time in space.

(B) included a great deal of zero – gravity exercises.

(C) was more physical than technical.

(D) Involved a strong background in math.

(E) Focused on the astronauts՚ communication procedures and abilities.

Ans. (D) Involved a strong background in math.

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