Types of Housing: Fundamentals of Geography YouTube Lecture Handouts

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Types of Housing: Fundamentals of Geography

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Types of Housing

Agenda

  • Types of housing

  • Characteristics of housing

Pueblo Revival Style

Image of Pueblo Revival Style House

Image of Pueblo Revival Style House

Pueblo Revival Style

  • Most popular in the Southwest in early 20th century

  • Influenced by the ancient Pueblo Indians' simple multifamily homes

  • Earthy materials such as adobe, concrete, stucco or mortar

  • Uses large wood beams

  • Enclosed courtyards and flat or sloping roofs

  • Rounded exteriors with square windows

Colonial Style

Image of Colonial Style House

Image of Colonial Style House

  • Usually 2 or 3 stories with high-pitched roof

  • One or more dormers

  • Massive chimneys

  • Narrow clapboard siding

  • Double-hung, multipane windows that are symmetrical on either side of central front door

  • Decorative crown over front door supported by pilasters or columns

Cape Cod Style

Image of Cape Cod Style House

Image of Cape Cod Style House

Cape Cod – by English Colonist in USA in 1600s

  • Steep roof with side gables, 1 chimney usually on end

  • 1.5 stories, with 1 or more dormers on the half story

  • Sided with wide clapboards, wood shingles, or brick

  • Centered front door, most often plain, but sometimes with portico

  • Hardwood floors and center hall floor plan

  • Multipaned, double-hung windows with decorative shutters

Cottage Style

Image of Cottage Style House

Image of Cottage Style House

Cottage Style

  • Tall, peaked roof

  • Masonry chimney

  • Meandering walkway to the front door

  • Large, multipane windows

  • Wood siding (often shingles)

  • Surrounded by flowers and climbing plants

Craftsman Style

Image of Craftsman Style House

Image of Craftsman Style House

Craftsman Style –Arts and Crafts

  • Low-pitched gable roof with exposed rafters, decorative beams, or braces under the gables

  • Wide, welcoming porch supported by massive columns

  • Wood, stone, or stucco siding

  • Double-hung windows often grouped in 3s, with upper sashes divided into 2-3 panes over plain lower sash

  • Open floor plan, built-in cabinets, shelving, and seating

  • Organic colors and natural materials

Farmhouse Style

Image of Farmhouse Style House

Image of Farmhouse Style House

Farmhouse Style – Simplified Victorian

  • Asymmetrical plan with dormers and gables

  • Either shingle or metal roof

  • Tall windows

  • Wrap around porch with some Victorian detailing

  • Lap siding with simple moldings and trim

Federal Revival Style

Image of Federal Revival Style House

Image of Federal Revival Style House

Federal Revival Style – Origin England, in USA in 1700s

  • Large 2-story brick with massive chimneys

  • Centered front door sheltered by portico and topped with fan-shaped transom light

  • Dentil moldings in cornice and fan-shape or elliptical gable windows

  • Palladian windows

  • Oval rooms and recessed wall niches

Georgian Revival Style

Image of Georgian Revival Style House

Image of Georgian Revival Style House

Georgian Revival Style

  • More angular than Federal

  • Common in USA 1715 to 1780s

  • Brick or wood sided, symmetrical & square in shape

  • Centered front door, usually flattened columns on each side & decorative crown on top

  • Medium-pitched roof with a chimney on every end

  • Minimal roof overhang

  • 5 double-hung windows or dormers across front with 9 or 12 panes in each sash

Victorian Style

Image of Victorian Style House

Image of Victorian Style House

Victorian Style

  • Queen Anne Style

  • Steep gable roofs

  • Ornamental woodwork

  • Tall, narrow windows

  • Turned columns, turrets, and porches

  • Decorative wooden brackets, patterned shingles, clapboard siding

  • Combinations of up to eight exterior colors on the same house

Shingle Style

Image of Shingle Style House

Image of Shingle Style House

Shingle Style

  • Vacation home along shores of New England

  • Origin in 19th Century

  • Variant of Victorian houses

  • Continuous shingle cladding on all exteriors

  • Free form with rambling architecture

  • Stone chimney

  • Wide porches, asymmetrical massing, dormer windows

  • Lower portion may be clad in heavy stone

Greek Revival Style

Image of Greek Revival Style House

Image of Greek Revival Style House

Greek Revival Style

  • Common in mid 1800s

  • Square, with tall double-hung windows on every side

  • Shallow-pitched roof

  • Front-facing columned portico, with supporting triangular pediment

  • White clapboard exterior

  • Decorative pilasters

  • Dentil moldings & heavy cornice

Italinate Style

Image of Italinate Style House

Image of Italinate Style House

Italinate Style

  • Based on villas in Italy

  • Between mid-to-late 1800s

  • Decorative corbels, window cornices

  • Doorways and porches with rounded windows

  • Columned entryways and rectangular windows

International Style

Image of International Style House

Image of International Style House

International Style

  • Less is more

  • Free flowing space

  • Lack of clutter

  • Flat roof and large expanses of glass

  • Neutral palette, simple geometric shapes

  • Constructed of steel and concrete so to have open interiors

  • Clad in white stucco or wood

  • Tubular steel railings around porches and decks

Mediterranean Revival Style

Image of Mediterranean Revival Style House

Image of Mediterranean Revival Style House

Mediterranean Revival Style

  • Heritage of mission church by Spanish colonist

  • Mainly in Southwest and California

  • Clad in adobe-like stucco

  • Flat or low-pitch roof with clay tiles

  • Balconies with black, wrought-iron railings

  • Often built around access to an inner courtyard

  • Deeply shaded porches and dark interiors

  • Terra-cotta pavers

Ranch House Style

Image of Ranch Style House

Image of Ranch Style House

Ranch House Style

  • 1950’s and 60’s

  • On cheap land

  • Economical houses

  • Single story, with low-pitched gable end

  • Rectangular or L or U-shaped

  • Long and low to the ground

  • Sliding glass doors leading to a patio

  • Attached garage with open floor plan

  • Plain look

Southern Colonial Style

Image of Southern Colonial Style House

Image of Southern Colonial Style House

Southern Colonial Style

  • Chimneys at end unlike northern version

  • Steeply pitched gable roof

  • Symmetrical in shape, with Centered front door

  • Multipane, tall, double-hung windows

  • Narrow plan, often only one room deep

  • Wide, welcoming front porch

  • Tall foundation walls to protect against moisture damage

Spanish Colonial Style

Image of Spanish Colonial Style House

Image of Spanish Colonial Style House

Spanish Colonial Style

  • In South-western USA

  • Massive masonry walls made of rough-cut stone blocks, or wood-frame walls with stucco

  • Muted earth tones of red clay on exterior

  • Small windows

  • Large, ornate wooden doors

  • Low, flat roof

Tudor Style

Image of Tudor Style House

Image of Tudor Style House

Tudor Style

  • Indicative of fairy-tale castles

  • Popular in USA in 1920-30s, & again in 70-'80s.

  • Steeply pitched roofs with wide gables and massive chimneys

  • Brick and stucco cladding with stone trim and door surrounds

  • Tall, narrow, casement windows with multiple panes

  • Larger Tudors feature wood and stucco half-timbering

Art Deco Style

Image of Art Deco Style House

Image of Art Deco Style House

Art Deco Style

  • Ancient Egypt, Hollywood and Miami Beach

  • Flat roof

  • Smooth Stucco Walls with rounded corners

  • Bold exterior decoration

  • Mostly for office buildings

Neoclassical Style

Image of Neoclassical Style House

Image of Neoclassical Style House

Neoclassical Style

  • Reflects architecture of Greece and Rome

  • In the early 20th century used by government buildings and universities

  • Symmetry, tall columns, elaborate doorways

  • Evenly spaced windows

  • Example is Thomas Jefferson's Monticello in Virginia

Contemporary Housing

Image of Contemporary Style House

Image of Contemporary Style House

Contemporary – Large Glass Panes

  • Natural siding materials like wood or stone

  • Odd, irregular shapes

  • Plain, lack of ornamentation

  • Open floor plan

  • Cathedral ceilings and exposed beams, or flat roofs

Prairie Style

Image of Prairie Style House

Image of Prairie Style House

Prairie Style

  • Simple material

  • Open floor

  • Long flat roofs

  • Rows of windows

  • Horizontal lines and organic patterns

Townhouse

Image of Town Style House

Image of Town Style House

Townhouse

  • Mostly found in urban areas

  • Called row house or townhouse

  • Popular in the early 19th century

  • Due to limited space and financial benefits for the architect/builder

  • They are two stories or more with a traditional layout, side hallways and minimal lawn space

Oriental Style

Image of Oriental Style House

Image of Oriental Style House

Oriental Style

  • Rooted in Chinese architecture

  • Curved roof that expands far beyond the exterior walls

  • Framed with beautiful landscaping

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