Competitive Exams: Philosphy MCQs (Practice-Test 3 of 90)

    • Assertion (A): According to Naiyayikas, the Carvakes claim that all inferences are invalid, is self-defeating.
    • Reason (R): The Carvakas employ inferences for establishing the claim that all inferences are invalid.
    1. Both A and R are true and R is the correct explanation of A

    2. Both A and R are true but R is NOT the correct explanation of A

    3. A is true but R is false

    4. A is false but R is true

    • Assertion (A): According to Nyaya philosophy pain and pleasure are known by inference.
    • Reason (R): According to them, pain and pleasure are not the objects of the external sense-organs.
    1. Both A and R are true and R is the correct explanation of A

    2. Both A and R are true but R is NOT the correct explanation of A

    3. A is true but R is false

    4. A is false but R is true

    • Assertion (A): In the Third Figure of syllogism, the conclusion must be particular.
    • Reason (R): In the Third Figure the minor premise is affirmative.
    1. Both A and R are true and R is the correct explanation of A

    2. Both A and R are true but R is NOT the correct explanation of A

    3. A is true but R is false

    4. A is false but R is true

    • Assertion (A): Logic does not concern itself directly with the factual truth of statements.
    • Reason (R): The validity of arguments which is the primary concern of Logic depends on their logical form.
    1. Both A and R are true and R is the correct explanation of A

    2. Both A and R are true but R is NOT the correct explanation of A

    3. A is true but R is false

    4. A is false but R is true

    • Assertion (A): According to descriptivism it is not always logically possible to separate the descriptive and evaluative meaning of a moral judgement.
    • Reason (R): The criteria of moral judgement are a matter of free choice.
    1. Both A and R are true and R is the correct explanation of A

    2. Both A and R are true but R is NOT the correct explanation of A

    3. A is true but R is false

    4. A is false but R is true

    • Assertion (A): Judgements of value and statements of fact are not categorically different from each other.
    • Reason (R): Statements of fact can be action-guiding.
    1. Both A and R are true and R is the correct explanation of A

    2. Both A and R are true but R is NOT the correct explanation of A

    3. A is true but R is false

    4. A is false but R is true

    • Assertion (A): Judgements of value and statements of fact are logically different from one another.
    • Reason (R): Judgement of value cannot be true or false.
    1. Both A and R are true and R is the correct explanation of A

    2. Both A and R are true but R is NOT the correct explanation of A

    3. A is true but R is false

    4. A is false but R is true

  1. Match List-I with List-II and select the correct answer:

    List-I (Philosopher) List-II (Books)
    1. Locke

    2. Aristotle

    3. Descartes

    4. Berkeley

    1. Three dialogues between Hylas and Philonous

    2. Essay concerning Human Understanding

    3. Categories

    4. Meditations on First Philosophy

    • A
    • B
    • C
    • D
      • 2
      • 3
      • 4
      • 1
      • 3
      • 2
      • 4
      • 1
      • 2
      • 3
      • 1
      • 4
      • 3
      • 2
      • 1
      • 4
  2. The view that individuals belonging to natural kinds are primary substances, is maintained by

    1. Plato

    2. Locke

    3. Descartes

    4. Aristotle

  3. Which one of the following is NOT accepted by Descartes?

    1. ‘Substance’ means that which requires nothing else in order to exit

    2. The word ‘substance’ cannot be predicated of God and other beings in strictly the same sense

    3. The word ‘substance’ applies primarily to God and relatively to creatures

    4. The word ‘substance’ has totally different meanings when predicated of minds and material bodies.

  4. Match List-I with List-II and select the correct answer:

    List-I (Doctrines) List-II (Philosophers)
    1. Substance is the compound of from and matter

    2. Substance is that which is conceived in itself

    3. Substance is the unknown support of qualities

    4. Substance is the inherent cause of qualities

    1. Descartes

    2. Locke

    3. Aristotle

    4. Nyaya-Vaisesika

    • A
    • B
    • C
    • D
      • 3
      • 4
      • 1
      • 2
      • 4
      • 3
      • 2
      • 1
      • 2
      • 1
      • 3
      • 4
      • 3
      • 1
      • 2
      • 4
  5. According to Locke the spirit and the body are

    1. Identical

    2. very similar though not identical

    3. different but with the same properties

    4. different with different properties

  6. Which one of the following is NOT accepted by Locke?

    1. There are no innate ideas in the mind

    2. There are innate powers in the mind

    3. All ideas of sensible qualities correctly represent the qualities of objects

    4. There are abstract ideas in the mind

  7. ‘Nothing can have extension without having colour therefore if the latter cannot exist without the mind, the former cannot so exist either.’ The argument is advanced by

    1. Locke

    2. Descartes

    3. Spinoza

    4. Barkeley

  8. According to Nyaya, mind is an internal senseorgan because it

    1. is assigned the function of thinking and contemplation

    2. cannot establish a direct contact with an object in the external world

    3. can serve as a mediator between soul and the external sense-organs

    4. discriminates between good and bad objects which do not belong to the external world