Beginning of Human Representation of Buddha & Schools and their Features for Competitive Exams

Download PDF of This Page (Size: 1.4M)

Beginning of Human Representation of Buddha

Image of buddha

Image of Buddha

Image of buddha

  • After Alexander’s invasion of India in B.C., the Indo-Greek, Indo Scythian, and Kushan kings ruled over its northwestern territories.

  • Under their patronage emerged a distinct style of sculpture, popularly known as the Greco Roman, Buddhist, or Gandhara art.

  • It was a product of the combination of Hellenistic, West Asiatic and native elements. Greek and Roman techniques, modified according to Indian requirements, were employed in fashioning the Gandhara sculpture.

  • His person was given some of the 32 suspicious bodily signs associated with the Mahapurushalakshana, such as the protuberance of the skull, the hair-knot, bindi between the eyebrows and elongated ears

  • In each case, it was produced by the local artist craftsmen working in the local tradition. At Mathura, it clearly emerges from the Yaksha tradition.

  • The Gandhara image might seem to resemble Apollo in some extraneous forms and does look characteristically Greco-Roman in drapery,

  • However, even there most of the images represent Buddha as seated in the typically Indian Yogic posture, a feature completely unknown to the Hellenistic tradition of art.

Schools and Their Features

  • Gandhar school of sculpture

  • Mathura school of sculpture

  • Amravati School of sculpture

    Image of Ganghar,Mathura and Amravati

    Image of Ganghar,Mathura and Amravati

    Image of Ganghar,Mathura and Amravati

Image of Gandhar, Mathura and Amravati

Image of Gandhar, Mathura and Amravati

Image of Gandhar, Mathura and Amravati