Vaccination vs. Immunization vs. Inoculation: Know the Difference! What is Vaccine? YouTube Lecture Handouts

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Vaccination vs. Immunization vs. Inoculation: Know the Difference! What is Vaccine?
  • The term inoculation, meanwhile, is often used interchangeably with vaccination or immunization. From a historical perspective, it describes the introduction of a substance into the body to confer protection. The term was first coined in the 18th century to describe variolation (the act of introducing a small amount of pus from someone with smallpox into the body of someone without it) .
  • As with immunization, the term inoculation almost invariably infers the use of vaccines.

Vaccination

Introduce vaccine to a person to protect against infection by inoculation or orally

  • Immunity: Protection from an infectious disease. If you are immune to a disease, you can be exposed to it without becoming infected.
  • Vaccine: A product that stimulates a person՚s immune system to produce immunity to a specific disease, protecting the person from that disease. Vaccines are usually administered through needle injections, but can also be administered by mouth or sprayed into the nose. Some vaccines contain a very small dose of a live but weakened form of a virus. Some vaccines contain a very small dose of killed bacteria or small parts of bacteria, and other vaccines contain a small dose of a modified toxin produced by bacteria.
  • Vaccines may also contain either a small amount of preservative or a small amount of an antibiotic to preserve the vaccine. Some vaccines may also contain a small amount of an aluminium salt, which helps produce a better immune response.
  • Vaccination: The act of introducing a vaccine into the body to produce immunity to a specific disease.
  • Immunization: A process by which a person becomes protected against a disease through vaccination. This term is often used interchangeably with vaccination or inoculation.

Immunization

  • Making body immune or resistant to infections
  • At community level
  • Pulse Polio Program

Differences

Vaccination and Immunization
VaccinationImmunization
Introduce vaccineBody՚s reaction to Vaccine
Individual levelLarge Scale
  • Vaccination does not guarantee complete resistance to a disease. It is usually injected or administered orally. Measles, mumps, rubella, tetanus, polio, hepatitis B and haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccines protect more than 95 % of children who have completed the course.
  • Immunization: Complete immunity occurs when the person fully recovers from the disease. It is not administered in any way; the body develops the resistance from vaccines
  • Vaccination: If mutation happens to microbe, it might render the vaccine ineffective (this is the reason why common cold has no vaccine)
  • Immunization: Variations of a disease impact the body՚s ability to generate an immune response

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